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frx

  • 3 years ago

What is the shortest distance from the point (x,y,z) to (a) the xy-plane (b) the x-axis? Could someone please explain this one, maybe with a (x,y,z) graph if possible?

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  1. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359041022174:dw|

  2. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    That's what I think of (a), shouldn't that be somewhat correct? Just get rid of the z and you're on the xy-plane

  3. sirm3d
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\Huge \color{blue}\checkmark\]

  4. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359041443154:dw|

  5. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    Shouldn't that be the shortest lenght to x?

  6. sirm3d
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359041552842:dw|use pythagorean theorem

  7. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{y ^{2}+z ^{2}}\]

  8. sirm3d
    • 3 years ago
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    right again.

  9. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    Great, having some trouble imagining three dimentions but seems like I'm starting to grasp it

  10. frx
    • 3 years ago
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    Thank you for the help!

  11. sirm3d
    • 3 years ago
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    yw

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