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katherinekc

  • one year ago

Two forces with magnitudes of 200 and 100 pounds act on an object at angles of 60° and 170° respectively. Find the direction and magnitude of these forces. Round to two decimal places in all intermediate steps and in your final answer. show work

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  1. youarestupid
    • one year ago
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    write something down if YOU want a medal

  2. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    i just need help on the problem please!

  3. youarestupid
    • one year ago
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    plus I am sorry but I do not know the answer

  4. Tushara
    • one year ago
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    calculate the vertical and horizontal components of each force, and then all the vertical forces together, then add horizontal forces together... after that u can combine the vertical and horizontal vector using pythagaros theorem to get the resulting force

  5. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    im not sure how to do all that .. im horrible in math and im just trying to pass so i can be done:(

  6. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    I know i have to resolve each vector into horizontal and vertical components using sin and cos but im not sure how to actually begin

  7. geerky42
    • one year ago
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    Always try to sketch. It may help you.|dw:1359302063400:dw|

  8. geerky42
    • one year ago
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    Just do what @Tushara told you to do.

  9. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    i just dont know where or how to really do it :/

  10. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1359302350812:dw|

  11. geerky42
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1359302341604:dw|\[\Large \sin \theta = \dfrac{y}{r} \Rightarrow r \sin \theta = y\]\[\Large \cos \theta = \dfrac{x}{r} \Rightarrow r \cos \theta = x\]

  12. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    but how would i put this all into writing to show my work? like in step form?

  13. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1359302475063:dw|

  14. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    i began with this.. is this a good start; f1x= 200cos(60) f1x= 100 cos (170) rx= 200 cos(60) + 100 cos(170)

  15. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    F1 = 200, F2 = 100 F1x = F1 cos 60 F1y = F1 sin 60 F2x = f2 cos 170 F2x =F2 sin 170 Rx = F1x + F2x Ry = F1y + F2y R(theta) = tan^1(Ry/Rx)

  16. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    On the second line, you mean f2x, but that's good.

  17. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    but now where do i go ?

  18. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now do the same for the force components in the y direction.

  19. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    whhat do u mean?

  20. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Do this: f1x= 200cos(60) f2x= 100 cos (170) rx= 200 cos(60) + 100 cos(170) For F1y, F2y, and Ry

  21. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    F1y = F1 sin 170 F2y = ... Ry = F1y + F2y = ...

  22. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    f1y = 100 sin (170) f2y = 200 sin ( ) ?? hmm

  23. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    F1 = 200, F2 = 100. You switched them.

  24. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    f1 = 200 sin (170) f2 = 100 sin (60) ??

  25. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    okay the it would be ..

  26. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You got the x-components above and you did it correctly. Now you need the y-components. f1y = 200 sin (60) f2y = 100 sin (170) Ry = f1y + f2y = 200 sin 60 + 100 sin 170

  27. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    ok i got the 70 and 170 mixed around

  28. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    There is no 70.

  29. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    i mean 60*

  30. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    sorry!

  31. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Remember the first force, F1, is 200 lb at 60 deg The x component is F1x = 200 cos 60 The y component is F1y = 200 sin 60 The second force, F2, is 100 lb at 170 deg The x component is F2x = 100 cos 170 The y component is F2y = 100 sin 170 The resultant's x-component is Rx = F1x + F2x = 200 cos 60 + 100 cos 170 The resultant's y-component is Ry = F1y + F2y = 200 sin 60 + 100 sin 170

  32. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now you need to do the actual calculations with a calculator of what Rx and Ry are, and round off to 2 decimal places.

  33. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    so all i have to do is put the equation in the calculator for rx and ry and thatll give me the answers?

  34. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    i need to complete the problem?

  35. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    For now, yes. That will give you the x- and y-components of the resultant.

  36. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    okay .. and thats all i do then right

  37. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    but i have to find the direction and magnitude?

  38. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    ??

  39. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Once you have the x- and y-components of the resultant, you need two more steps. 1. You need to find the magnitude of the resultant. 2. You need to find the direction of the resultant.

  40. katherinekc
    • one year ago
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    how do i do that?

  41. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    For the magnitude of the resultant, you use the Pythagoras theorem. For the direction of the resultant, you use the inverse tangent to get the angle. See figure below: |dw:1359304507660:dw|

  42. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    yes

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