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How are the results of genetic drift similar to the results of gene flow? Both result in a loss of individuals from the affected population. Both result in an increased rate of mutation within the population. Both result in a change in allele frequencies in the affected population. Both result in a loss of genetic diversity in large populations.

Biology
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Is it the second one?
its the third
Hmmmm now I was going to say you were correct that it is the second answer, however a loss in genetic diversity would indicate a change in allele frequencies. Now gene flow could result in reduced diversity, but not necessarily? Could you explain your reasoning DrAmaQueen, I feel like I am missing something :/ P.S. Please don't outright provide answers (though its a bit late for this question). It is better to guide the user to an answer rather than doing all the work yourself. We discourage giving out answers without letting the asker at least take some part in the analysis.

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Other answers:

well in lay man terms, gene flow is the migration of allelle in or out of a populations gene pool, e.g adding the allelle for blue to a population with predominantly brown eyes, that sure creates a frequency change and causes diversity..... genetic drift however, going with the name indicates a change in genetic frequency mostly due to chance (where a more favourable genetic material is selected over another) and natural dissasters, hence genetic material is lost. both cause changes in allelle frequency over time....
Ah okay, I think you got a little mixed up (or something). So I think the answer is "Both result in a change in allele frequencies in the affected population." Which is true from what you are saying. However the third option "Both result in a loss of genetic diversity in large populations." is not correct as gene flow can be both directions and can cause an increase or decrease in diversity. On genetic drift - "(where a more favourable genetic material is selected over another) and natural dissasters, hence genetic material is lost. both cause changes in allelle frequency over time...." Keep in mind that there is no selection in genetic drift and more favourable traits are just as likely to be lost. Genetic drift is purely random, if an allele is lost in a population purely by chance (it can therefore can reduce fitness) it cannot be returned.
i don't remeber writing that they both resulted in loss of genetic diversity :S
lol! You wrote "it's the third".
loss in genetic diversity is the 4th.....i use glasses but i can see the screen.....-_-
Heh, my bad *facepalm*.. didn't notice the first option.
:P....i have a spare glasses, let me know if u need it
Nah, I think its the brain I need ;P Hope I didn't confuse you luvvbear!
I'm confused. What's the answer?

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