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seancashmere

  • 3 years ago

what is the antiderivative of f'(x)=4/(1-x^2)^(1/2) if f(1/2) = 1?

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  1. seancashmere
    • 3 years ago
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    so it's the stupid chain rule that's messing me up. I have no clue how to find this. Wolfram Alpha throws sin inverse at me!

  2. abb0t
    • 3 years ago
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    Chain rule? Then, does that mean you are referring to derivatives?

  3. abb0t
    • 3 years ago
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    B/c the anti-derivative of that would technically be arcsine.

  4. slaaibak
    • 3 years ago
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    integrate using x=sin u

  5. seancashmere
    • 3 years ago
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    well, I took a stab at it and got 8(1/2-1/3(x)^3)^(-1/2) but when I tried to check it, the chain rule throws it all off! We haven't gotten to integrating yet! I don't even know what that means.

  6. seancashmere
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay, I guess I have to review this chapter in my textbook. I thought this homework assignment would only be based on what we did in class....

  7. seancashmere
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, I get it now. It's an identity. The d/dx of sin inverse is 1/(1-x)^2. Thanks again!

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