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raja23

  • one year ago

Hey guys im trying to convert non linear eqn into linear, where can I find more information about this?

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  1. CanadianAsian
    • one year ago
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    It depends on the type of equation. There are lots of different ways to do it.

  2. raja23
    • one year ago
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    yes, i'm just trying to refresh my knowledge on it. Do you know of any good source where I can see some examples?

  3. CanadianAsian
    • one year ago
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    For Differential Equations after calculus or for derivatives?

  4. raja23
    • one year ago
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    well I guess it would be after calculus but this is the eqn \[dy/dt=-5y^2+3uy+6u^2\]

  5. CanadianAsian
    • one year ago
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    There is no way to make that linear. It's a quadratic and polynomials of degrees other than one cannot be changed to become linear.

  6. raja23
    • one year ago
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    yikes well too bad I have it as an assignment question :P thanks though

  7. CanadianAsian
    • one year ago
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    Also, are you sure all the variables are right? Because right now you have a diff.eq in which you're deriving with respect to a variable that isn't on the right side of your equation...

  8. raja23
    • one year ago
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    dy/dt? there are ys on the right side?

  9. CanadianAsian
    • one year ago
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    Yes but the equation is taking the derivative with respect to t. It would be the same as if I had equation y = x^2 + xy + y^2 and then took the derivative with respect to t I would get dy/dt = 0 because I have no variables with t in them, therefore everything else is considered a constant. Since you don't have t on the right side anymore, I'm assuming that the original equation was something like (−5y^2+3uy+6u^2)*t Otherwise, the right side would be dy/du

  10. raja23
    • one year ago
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    good catch but the question given has dy/dt though, i'm guessing prof made a mistake :)

  11. raja23
    • one year ago
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    sorry just realized both u and y are a function of t, should be y(t) and u(t)

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