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aish_premrenu

  • 3 years ago

Does NO form a dimer?

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  1. aish_premrenu
    • 3 years ago
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    Somebody! please help. cause I have another Q to ask, and can't do that until I get the answer to this and close it!

  2. aish_premrenu
    • 3 years ago
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    @BluFoot

  3. BluFoot
    • 3 years ago
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    Google is your friend. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=define+dimer Are N and O identical?

  4. aish_premrenu
    • 3 years ago
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    No! im asking whether one NO molecule joins with another one to form a dimer of NO molecules. Not whether and N and O join together to form a dimer!

  5. BluFoot
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh. NO it doesn't :P

  6. aish_premrenu
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay. just confused because NO2 also has an odd electron. But it does form a dimer. Also, I read somewhere that NO cannot form a dimer cause of MO theory. But somewhere else i read about the colour of its dimer! Confused! And I did google it. :-P NO satisfactory result though.

  7. aaronq
    • 3 years ago
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    "Nitric oxide dimers (NO)2 are formed when nitric oxide is cooled, liquified, or frozen. In the gas phase dimer the NO monomers are bound by 710 +/- 40 cm^-1" http://www.chem.uregina.ca/~east/ONNOelec.pdf

  8. aish_premrenu
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks a lot, @aaronq. Exactly what I needed.

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