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dainel40

  • 3 years ago

The magnitude of F is 384 newtons and it points at 344o measured counterclockwise from the positive x-axis. What is the x component (in newtons) of F?

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  1. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    Draw a picture and the answer should be fairly simple:|dw:1359421352236:dw|\[|A|=16^{\circ}\]\[Ax=|A|cos(\theta)\]\[Ay=|A|sin(\theta)\]

  2. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    but i don't kno what to do.. Do i subtract 360-344?

  3. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, to find the angle above (as I did) you do 360-344. That gives you theta

  4. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    So to find the amount of force in just the x direction you would have:\[F_x=(384N)cos(16)=369.12N\]

  5. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    oh

  6. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks! so much.. Could i ask u another question if u dont mind?

  7. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    ok

  8. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    Question 2 of 6 -F points in the opposite direction as F and has the same magnitude as F True/False Question 3 of 6 F1 = (8.4,3.4) and F2 = (-7.1,-5.8) where all components are in newtons. What is the exact x-component of F1 + F2 (in newtons)?

  9. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    The first one is true. For the second one you have to do vector addition: F1=(8.4,3.4) which states that the x value is 8.4 and the y value is 3.4. F2=(-7.1,-5.8) which states that the x value is -7.1 and the y value is -5.8. The resultant vector (in component notation) will simply be: Fresult=[(8.4+(-7.1)), (3.4+(-5.8))]Just perform the math and you'll know what the answer to the second question is.

  10. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    dont i just need the value of x? so it will be 8.4+-7.1 = 1.3

  11. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    If it's not clear, I'm just adding the x's and y's. You should end up with Fresult=(1.3, -2.4)

  12. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes

  13. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    ok thanks!. how would u do this question. F = (30.8,44.4), where all components are in newtons. If a vector's direction is measured counterclockwise from the positive x-axis, what angle (in degrees, from 0-360) does the negative vector -F make?

  14. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    Can I do opp/adj and then find the inverse tangent?

  15. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    to get the angle

  16. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes

  17. Cloverpetal
    • 3 years ago
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    hey, @Shane_B when you're done, wanna help me? :)

  18. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359423352611:dw|

  19. Shane_B
    • 3 years ago
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    A better picture...

  20. dainel40
    • 3 years ago
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    ok thanks!

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