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Subrina

  • 3 years ago

Fine the measures of the numbered angles and then find area ( Rhombus)

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  1. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    figure?

  2. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry that wasnt my question but I can post it

  3. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    my picture

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  4. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry, figure is quite not clear

  5. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    its number 7 http://www.ocs.cnyric.org/webpages/jmelfi/files/GE09S3P1.PDF

  6. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359428413420:dw|

  7. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    how did you get that

  8. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359428663385:dw|

  9. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    Now, AREA of rhombus =4*1/2 *4/2 *7/2

  10. whpalmer4
    • 3 years ago
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    A different way to the same result: the diagonal of the rhombus bisects the angles, so we have pairs of 30 angles at each narrow end, and the sum of the interior angles must be (4-2)*180 = 360, and we've already accounted for 4*30 = 120 of that, so that leaves (360-120)/2 = 120 for each pair on the blunt angles, or 60 each.

  11. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    dont you do 1/2 d1*d2

  12. whpalmer4
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, the area of a rhombus is given by \(\frac{1}{2}d_1d_2\) so all you need now is the lengths of the two diagonals. Do you know them?

  13. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    is it 1/2 16*14=112

  14. whpalmer4
    • 3 years ago
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    Looks to me like the half diagonals are 7m and 4m, aren't they? So 14 and 8 would be the full diagonals?

  15. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    yes your right so then u would slove it then get 56 as answer

  16. whpalmer4
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, I believe that is correct.

  17. Subrina
    • 3 years ago
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    ok

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