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brinazarski

  • 3 years ago

Can someone please help me solve this math problem? http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t120/brinazarski2/q_zpsf15a8e87.png

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  1. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359418232187:dw|

  2. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    It's a homework lol

  3. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    I solved it

  4. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    1. First find the midpoints of the diagonals. So let their intersection point be O, then find the length of AO and BO

  5. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    2. The diagonals of a rhombus intersect at 90 degree angles, so use Pythagorean Theorem to find the length of AB

  6. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    How do you find the length of AO and BO?

  7. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    AO and BO represent half the lengths of their respective diagonals.

  8. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    AO is half the length of AC BO is half the length of BD

  9. Falkqwer
    • 3 years ago
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    so 8 and 15

  10. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay

  11. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    3. Draw the line segment PQ 4. Assume P and Q are the midpoints of AO and BO 5. Find PO and QO. 6. Use Pythagorean Theorem once more to find PQ.

  12. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    So AB = rad225?

  13. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    or 15

  14. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    WAIT

  15. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    It's not 15

  16. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry

  17. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    i was adding 75 and 150 from multiplying 15 by itself lol

  18. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    rad289

  19. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    or 17

  20. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, good

  21. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    PQ = 8.5

  22. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    So.. is that it? Is the answer E then?

  23. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    Great job bro

  24. brinazarski
    • 3 years ago
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    Awesome! Thanks so much! :)

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