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NotTim

  • 3 years ago

I need help understanding diagrams.

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  1. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    For Example

  2. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359418634316:dw|

  3. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    so where would the 45 degree angle go i nthe triangle?

  4. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    i never did get it right

  5. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359448218371:dw|

  6. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    This should help ?

  7. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359419770094:dw| @shubhamsrg ?

  8. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    45 will be special case where all angles be 45 Leme explain you a general case, with angle = x

  9. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    say it wasn't 45...

  10. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359448684677:dw|

  11. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359448743336:dw|

  12. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 3 years ago
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    Hint: Except in geometrical solving of problems, NEVER EVER draw general diagrams with 45° angles. Always draw 20° to 30° angles. It will save you a lot of time.

  13. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359448787878:dw|

  14. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359448817064:dw|

  15. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359448798875:dw|

  16. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359420708200:dw| So I know what is going on, then this would be correct also?

  17. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359449644111:dw| WHere does this direction point to? If it is horizontal, then you are wrong again. "Your" angle is the other one.

  18. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    @Vincent-Lyon.Fr how do you get that?

  19. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    just remember when parallel to the slope means: Force produced by the weight-> mgsinx if its perpendicular ( normal ) to the slope, use mgcosx

  20. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    the main slope, or the new, smaller slope?

  21. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    the original one, below the slope, angle use 45 degrees

  22. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359455671403:dw| For x axis : is always sine For y axis : is always cosine

  23. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    wait. sorry, so hwo can i derive where the angle will be?

  24. tcy
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359457894005:dw|

  25. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    just use this angle for both axis|dw:1359458196671:dw|

  26. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    wait...so how do i know the angle for the hypothetical top triangle?

  27. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359460336556:dw|

  28. NotTim
    • 3 years ago
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    Ok. To anyone else answering, I will be leaving within 5 minutes. Thamks for all the help guys! At the very least, I know where the angles go, even if I do not knw how to derive it.

  29. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    you have to know your trigonometry well and have to look at different angles to solve this problem

  30. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359461884908:dw| For the force directed on x axis due to resultant force, F on x = Fcos(30) For the force directed on y axis due to resultant force, F on y = Fsin(30)

  31. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    Then,

  32. Calculator
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359462169659:dw|

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