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MarilynReyes

  • 3 years ago

Find the distance between the points (2, -5) and (-3, 0)

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  1. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    subtract, square, add, sqrt

  2. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    what do we get when we subtract one point from the other? (2,-5) - (-3,0) -------- ? , ?

  3. MarilynReyes
    • 3 years ago
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    -1, -5 ???

  4. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    close; 2 - - 3 = 5 so lets go with 5, -5 :) what do we get when we square each of those values?

  5. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    there are 4 steps in all, we are at #2 :)

  6. MarilynReyes
    • 3 years ago
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    so it's 5, -5 over 2, 2

  7. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    no, lets focus on squaring the parts that we found: 5, -5 would you agree that this squares to 25,25 ?

  8. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    the formula for distance is generally stated as:\[d=\sqrt{(x-x_o)^2+(y-y_o)^2}\] i tend to put the wrong parts in the wrong places so I like to step thru it: subtract square add sqrt

  9. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    given 2 point: (x,y) and (xo,yo) step1: subtract ( x, y ) - (xo,yo) --------- x-xo, y-yo step2: square (x-xo)^2 , (y-yo)^2 step3: add (x-xo)^2 + (y-yo)^2 step 4: sqrt sqrt((x-xo)^2 + (y-yo)^2) which is how the formula is developed.

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