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elexusvanderhorst

  • one year ago

help ( attached below)

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  1. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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  2. GraceJaylene
    • one year ago
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    @Directrix

  3. GraceJaylene
    • one year ago
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    @usccarolinagurl @ariellynn1 @amistre64 @ajprincess @KonradZuse

  4. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    The y-intercept is where the graph cuts the y-axis. Read that point from the graph and post here. Then, we'll have to figure the slope.

  5. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    -3

  6. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    Okay. We'll use the slope-intercept form of the equation of a line: y = mx + b where b is the y-intercept and m is the slope.

  7. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    So far, we have y = mx -3. One way to think about slope is the change in y over the change in x. @elexusvanderhorst How have you been computing slope? We'll do what you already know although I'm thinking we can read the slope off the graph. Tell me what you think.

  8. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    ive always been confused on how to do slope

  9. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    We'll read it from this graph. I'll post a diagram shortly. Before that, recall that slope has to do with the rate of change of y with respect to x. If the slope of a line is 5 over 7, then that means every time x moves 7 units to the right, the corresponding value of y moves up 5 units.

  10. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    For a line, slope is constant. In this problem, as x moves 2 to the right, y goes up by 1. So, the slope is 1/2. So, what is the equation of the line in y = mx + b form? Recall that you already found the intercept (So far, we have y = mx -3) .

  11. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    Look at the diagram for a "picture" of slope.

  12. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    y=1/2x-3

  13. alahrichi1
    • one year ago
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    omg dude I <3 ur pic

  14. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    me?

  15. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    @alahrichi1 thanks i love one direction

  16. alahrichi1
    • one year ago
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    no santa claus

  17. alahrichi1
    • one year ago
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    me 2 fanned u becuz of it

  18. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    lol thanks

  19. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    @elexusvanderhorst yes for y=1/2x-3. I might write it as y = (1/2) x - 3. I <3 ur pic --> I thought she was talking about my diagram.

  20. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    @Directrix thank you for your help

  21. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    Glad to help.

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