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sakigirl

  • 3 years ago

Is h(x)=x^2 the inverse of g(x)=sqrt x ?

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  1. sakigirl
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359610492592:dw|

  2. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    yep!

  3. sakigirl
    • 3 years ago
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    Can you explain? :) @AravindG

  4. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    put \[y=\sqrt{x}\] then x=\(\sqrt{y}\)

  5. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    hence \[\sqrt{x}\] is the inverse!

  6. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    you can also try this: check goh=x

  7. sakigirl
    • 3 years ago
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    How is x=√y prove that x^2 is the inverse?

  8. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    well if y is given in terms of x x in terms of y is the inverse

  9. sakigirl
    • 3 years ago
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    This may sound like a dumb question, but the y turns back into an x, making root y into a root x making it x^2?

  10. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    yep that is because we always report a function in the form y=something

  11. sakigirl
    • 3 years ago
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    @AravindG Thanks!

  12. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    yw :)

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