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yrelhan4

  • 3 years ago

a wire is bent as a parabolic curve kept in x-y plane. the curve can be described by the equation x^2=6y. if a uniform magnetic field B=2*10^-3 k tesla (positive z direction) is applied, force experienced by the wire is nearly?

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  1. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    oops. the wire carries a current i=2A

  2. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    length ?

  3. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359707566710:dw|

  4. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    So the wire extends from (-6,6) to (6,6) only right ?

  5. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    we dont know the x coordinates.

  6. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh am sorry, I don't know why assumed the height to be 6, nevermind.

  7. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay, so the working formula is F = iBl

  8. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    Where are you stuck ?

  9. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    what should be l? or i always use idl * b. dl here..

  10. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    l = distance between 2 ends of wire.

  11. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    we should have x coordinates then?

  12. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    nopes. distance between the ends is already given right,

  13. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359708383481:dw|

  14. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    Is that 6 ? or the co-ordinate on y axis (0,6) ?

  15. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    coordinate on y axis.

  16. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    I see, then use the given eqn, find co-ordinates of x, as I said before, they should come out to be (-6,6) and (6,6)

  17. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    ohho.. ok. damn. it was easy. :P thank you.

  18. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    you should also be able to find out direction of force, can you tell me what will that be ?

  19. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    -j?

  20. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    Yep, ^_^

  21. yrelhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    hmm. thank you. :)

  22. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    Note that direction of force is different at different points on the force, -j is the direction of net force. Anyways, glad to help.

  23. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
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    different at different points of the wire*

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