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RyanL.

  • 2 years ago

How would you find the area of this shape?

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  1. RyanL.
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1359762044842:dw| Shape not drawn to scale.

  2. RyanL.
    • 2 years ago
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    It's a field that I got from google maps and I got the sides from the scaling but I'm trying to find the area. This is a rough estime so please help me out

  3. SmartWish
    • 2 years ago
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    Without getting to complicated, you could pretend it to be a triangle. 1000*750/2 ft

  4. RyanL.
    • 2 years ago
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    I want to get a much closer area....I did find out that the angle is around 100 degrees if that helps

  5. RyanL.
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1359763267062:dw| found the area of the inside now

  6. SmartWish
    • 2 years ago
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    pi * 750 * 1000 is a quite good approx i think? Can someone verify?

  7. tcarroll010
    • 2 years ago
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    You know, if it were me, the way I'd do it is to realize that the1500 ft area looks almost like an arc. I'd subtract 125 from 1000 ( same as adding 125 to 750) and take that as the radius and go with the area of the sector of a circle with radius of 875.

  8. SmartWish
    • 2 years ago
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    What do you think about the area of the eclipse times (100/360)?

  9. tcarroll010
    • 2 years ago
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    @SmartWish I think using an ellipse like you suggested would be even better than a circle sector except that the angle is not 90 degrees so that approximation starts going into the direction of exact calculations almost. Either is good.

  10. tcarroll010
    • 2 years ago
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    If you want to use an ellipse to approximate the shape and if you want to have fun with numbers, you could integrate the area between the ellipse and the equation of a line. That would give a really accurate result.

  11. SmartWish
    • 2 years ago
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    I like your suggestions!

  12. tcarroll010
    • 2 years ago
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    Math is fun!

  13. tcarroll010
    • 2 years ago
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    It would be easy to get the equation of a line running at that 100 degrees and maybe rotate the figure.

  14. tcarroll010
    • 2 years ago
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    Good luck in all of your studies and thx for the recognition! Hope that we were of help, @RyanL.

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