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Frostbite Group Title

Anyone who would like to elaborate the nuclear Overhauser effect known from NMR? Don't fully understand why it is explained as a "through space interaction" Sorry it is a bit "off topic" from biology, but sense I work with biological molecules I choosed to post it here.

  • one year ago
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  1. Frostbite Group Title
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    @Preetha @blues

    • one year ago
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    @ataly

    • one year ago
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    I know it is when a nucleus affect another nucleus by irradiation as a result of dipole-dipole interactions. Which again might be a result of the spin-spin relaxation (unsure about that detale). My problem is... If was I was asked to say this in another way, I would not be able to... Which only make me think I don't understand it.

    • one year ago
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    I believe it has to do with the fact that spin polarization of one group can influence the spin of another group over time. I can't give you the exact processes that take place but it's very logical if you think about it.. Eventually everything returns to a state of equilibrium. The Nuclear Overhauser effect is the name of this process when it comes to spin polarization. At least, that's how I understood it, I'm not completely sure it's right though..

    • one year ago
  5. Koikkara Group Title
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    READ AND UNDERSTAND .... http://www.ias.ac.in/initiat/sci_ed/resources/chemistry/James.T.pdf

    • one year ago
  6. ataly Group Title
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    NOE is used for large biomolecules. For small ones you can guess the structure from through bonds coupling. For e.g. proteins you need to get distances between non-bonded atoms that get close in space when the protein folds. NOE gives you that. The document provided by Koikkara explains why.

    • one year ago
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