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Bataman

  • one year ago

I am confused when finding some specific method in Python documentation. There are so many materials provided online , but how can I find what I want? I just want to find some codes of some methods ,but it takes too long time to find them ,can someone give me some help?

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  1. Gianko15
    • one year ago
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    mmm try this link http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/datastructures.html#dictionaries

  2. JonathanFichter
    • one year ago
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    Can you mention a few of the methods you want to learn about? Depending on which ones they are, I bet some of us might have good specific resources in mind? Or maybe we could even custom-make some examples for you!

  3. bwCA
    • one year ago
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    i find the help file that was installed with the program (i am using windows) much easier to use than the online help. also, you might want to just bite-the-bullet and read the entire tutorial in the python documentation - maybe even several times as time goes on.

  4. shawnf
    • one year ago
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    http://rgruet.free.fr/PQR25/PQR2.5.html Is pretty good for python 2.5 as a concise reference.

  5. JonathanFichter
    • one year ago
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    Ganko15's link has lots of info and is the authoritative source, but it's not the easiest read. Shawnf's link is a good cheat sheet. It doesn't explain in language that's especially simple, but batman should still check it out. If you want something that provides clearer explanation, you might enjoy this: http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english2e/index.html You don't have to read it like a book because it has a great table of contents AND index, so you can jump quickly to dictionary methods, for example. And one of the authors, Jeff Elkner, is a dedicated educator and thoughtful guy. (The others might be, too, I just haven't met them yet!) :)

  6. michaelokt
    • one year ago
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    I've found that the time it take to find what you're looking for depends a lot on your experience as a programmer. I always do a Google search first. Sometimes, I get lucky and it shows up right there on the search page. Most of the times, I've had to search forums and actually read codes written by others. Reading other people's codes is the hardest skill to learn, but the payoff is the huge. I rarely use documentations. I only read the ones that are assigned as extra resources.

  7. Bataman
    • one year ago
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    Because I am a green hand in programming, so I am not skilled at finding those methods,but thank you for your helps,because I can have more chances to try and with your help I can make less mistakes, so I will try both of the materials provided above and find an effective one for me.THANKS

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