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P.nut1996

  • 3 years ago

Algebra 2 help? Adding and subtracting radical expressions... So lost

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  1. LilHefner3
    • 3 years ago
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    i got a 100% on that

  2. P.nut1996
    • 3 years ago
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    Wanna help me out?? :)

  3. azolotor
    • 3 years ago
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    What's the question?

  4. P.nut1996
    • 3 years ago
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    \[7\sqrt{13x}-15\sqrt{2x}+2\sqrt{13x}-4\sqrt{2x}\]

  5. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    like asking what is \[7y-15z+2y-4z\] exactly

  6. azolotor
    • 3 years ago
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    Just combine like terms

  7. P.nut1996
    • 3 years ago
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    How?

  8. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    for example \(7\sqrt{13x}+2\sqrt{13x}=9\sqrt{13x}\)

  9. P.nut1996
    • 3 years ago
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    and \[-15\sqrt{2x}-4\sqrt{2x}=-19\sqrt{2x}\]

  10. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    yes

  11. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    put them together and get \[9\sqrt{13x}-19\sqrt{2x}\] there is nothing more than can be done

  12. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    since \(\sqrt{13x}\)and \(\sqrt{2x}\) are not like terms, you cannot combine them in one term

  13. P.nut1996
    • 3 years ago
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    So that is all? Wow, that's much easier than I thought! Thank you so much! ;D

  14. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    yw

  15. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    like most math, it is easy when you know what to do

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