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mariomintchev

  • one year ago

I need help with problem 4. I'm supposed to use the Poisson Distribution, but I'm confused because part A says 6 or MORE. (I obviously can't go to infinity, so what do I do? If it was 6 or LESS, I would plug in 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1... in for P(x).)

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  1. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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  2. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    @satellite73 @phi @LoveYou*69 @karatechopper @jim_thompson5910 @Jemurray3 @Hero @AccessDenied

  3. Jemurray3
    • one year ago
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    So you could find the probability of five or less, right?

  4. Jemurray3
    • one year ago
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    Consider the fact that the only two possible outcomes are that it occurs five or fewer times, or six or more times.

  5. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    yes, because it's not continuous. it's a discrete number. i have an example like that in my notes.

  6. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    "Consider the fact that the only two possible outcomes are that it occurs five or fewer times, or six or more times." Ok, continue...

  7. Jemurray3
    • one year ago
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    haha well, that was the main hint... If there are only two possible outcomes, and you calculate the probability for one, then you immediately know the probability of the other, right?

  8. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    because you can do 1-the other

  9. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    so should i find plug in 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 into the equation and then subtract that answer from 1??

  10. Jemurray3
    • one year ago
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    Good idea. Though probably only from 5 down, if you want to include 6 in "6 or more"

  11. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    so i should do: p(5)= e^(-2.5) * 2.5^(5) / 5! + p(4)= e^(-2.5) * 2.5^(4) / 4! + ........

  12. phi
    • one year ago
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    I would calculate the prob of 0,1,2,3,4 or 5 events then 1 - sum = pr(k≥6)

  13. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    so what i said above ^^^ ???

  14. phi
    • one year ago
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    you left out 0

  15. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    yeah and included 6. i needa include 0 and exclude 6. everything else seems good though, right?

  16. phi
    • one year ago
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    yes

  17. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    ok, and for part b do i plug in 15 through 20 for p(x) and then add them up?

  18. phi
    • one year ago
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    with lambda= 2.5*8 =20

  19. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    wait, what? do i place that 20 before e and before the ^ (-x) ??

  20. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    \[(\lambda) ^ - \lambda x) \

  21. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    i'm gonna log off but please continue helping (with #s 5-8 on the wkst) everyone!! i'll be back tomorrow to continue this madness. haha

  22. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    @phi @amistre64 can you clarify what i do with the lambda?

  23. phi
    • one year ago
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    for part b \[ Pr(k)= \frac{\lambda^k e^{-\lambda}}{k!} \] λ= 20, the number of events in 8 hours

  24. phi
    • one year ago
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    If I did it right, I got Pr(15 to 20) = 0.4542

  25. mariomintchev
    • one year ago
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    ok what formula is that? i thought you said we use the poisson one for #4?

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