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swin2013

  • 3 years ago

FTC and definite integrals?

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  1. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    integral from (0 to 2) of the function (x^3/3 +2x) dx

  2. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    isn't the anti derivative x^2 + 2?

  3. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    @zepdrix

  4. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    No the `derivative` is x^2+2. I think you went in the wrong direction :)

  5. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    Ohh ok. so i need to take the derivative -_- lol

  6. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    You do? :o

  7. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Do you know how to apply the `Power Rule` to integrals? :)

  8. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    well it says to evaluate using FTC. yea it's like when you subtract 1 from the exponent

  9. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    something like that hahaha

  10. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    i meant add lol

  11. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    and divide by the exponent

  12. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    `Power Rule for Derivatives`: ~Multiply by the power. ~Decrease the power by 1. `Power Rule for Integration`: ~Increase the power by 1. ~Divide by the power. Ok good, seems you understand already :)

  13. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    lol yea :) hopefully i don't mess that process up ahahaha

  14. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    x^4/4 +x^2?

  15. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    One tiny boo boo, you forgot about the 3 under the first term.

  16. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    for the x^3/3 part?

  17. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    ya

  18. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    you `gain` a 4 on the bottom, it doesn't change your 3 to a 4 silly!

  19. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    OOPS! x^4/4*3

  20. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    i got 16/3

  21. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    That's what I'm coming up with also, I think that's correct!

  22. swin2013
    • 3 years ago
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    thanksssssssssss!

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