Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

lala2

  • one year ago

PLEASE CLICK HERE!

  • This Question is Closed
  1. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Anyone??

  2. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    every time there is a change you have a branch |dw:1360180390830:dw|

  3. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Im supposed to write out an explanation

  4. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Im still confused..

  5. aaronq
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    yeah at the node sounds reasonable

  6. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what?? @aaronq

  7. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @phi can u please explain a little more

  8. aaronq
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    1 Attachment
  9. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    But how can i explain this by writing it out... @phi and @aaronq

  10. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The 3 changes mean 3 "bifurcations" (branches) in the tree from their last common ancestor

  11. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @aaronq ???

  12. aaronq
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    yeah you could argue that the 3 changes in amino acids happened 3 splits/branches from the ancestor (one every split), or you could argue that they all happened at once, regardless, it doesn't tell you the similarities between the common ancestor and the descendants, so you don't know if one's hemoglobin mutated and the other didn't. But they would still be branching off the common ancestor. So to summarize node common ancestor (node), descendants (tips of branches).|dw:1360181281410:dw|

  13. lala2
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that is much more clear.. Thanks @aaronq !

  14. aaronq
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    no problem !

  15. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.