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Faman39

  • one year ago

How does the movement of particles of matter change when matter goes from solid to liquid? increases decreases increases then decreases does not change

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  1. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    @moongazer @MicroBot

  2. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    @rajathsbhat

  3. rajathsbhat
    • one year ago
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    The particles in a solid are held together by forces which prevents them from changing shape (or moving away from each other). When a solid turns into a liquid, the particles get enough energy to wiggle away from each other and thus break out of formation. That's why liquids don't have a specific shape. Think of the solid as a bunch of babies who are asleep and are tied together by a piece of rope. You give them some sugar and they become hyper and start to wiggle away from each other. That's what happens when a solid becomes a liquid.

  4. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    increase to decrease ?

  5. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    right?

  6. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    sorry, it is doesnt change

  7. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    sorry you meant, decrease

  8. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    solid to liquid

  9. rajathsbhat
    • one year ago
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    no. I told you that the babies (particles) get enough energy to move away from each other and never come back to formation. They keep moving around. In a solid, they weren't moving around at all. Now that they're liquid, they keep moving around until they hit a wall (the wall of a jug, for example). They then change direction and keep moving. So what do you think?

  10. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    increase?

  11. rajathsbhat
    • one year ago
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    Yes. :)

  12. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    thanks you so much @rajathsbhat !!! your are totally amazing!!!!!

  13. rajathsbhat
    • one year ago
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    Thanks. I do what i can ;)

  14. Faman39
    • one year ago
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    :) thanks alot again

  15. rajathsbhat
    • one year ago
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    Yw :)

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