Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

bettyboop8904

  • one year ago

integral help, equation below

  • This Question is Closed
  1. bettyboop8904
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\int\limits_{}^{}e ^{2\Theta}\sin(3\Theta)d \Theta \] that e is the to the power of 2 theta

  2. shubhamsrg
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Integration by parts to the aid.

  3. khoala4pham
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ugh. This one is really hard to explain. One round of integration by parts doesn't cut it. Only after two rounds of integration by parts can you get an answer. Just do two rounds of integration byparts. Then you will see that your integral in your SECOND time of ibp is the SAME integral as the one you started with times some constant. With this, you can add or subtract it back to the left hand side and then divide out.

  4. bettyboop8904
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i got so far as to thinking it was going to be one of those integrals that has the repeated original equation within the integration by parts but there is a -1/6 in front of it and i don't know how to get rid of it without it getting messy

  5. bettyboop8904
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    did i maybe do it wrong? or is there supposed to be a -1/6 in front of the repeated original equation?

  6. khoala4pham
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You're right. Like I said before, you probably have some constant multiplied with it. It's the very same integral right? So what do you do if you have a = b + c + d + a/2 and you need to solve for a? I'd subtract a/2 from both sides: a/2 = b + c + d and get a = 2(b+c+d) Here, your integral is a!

  7. bettyboop8904
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh geez i feel dumb = (

  8. khoala4pham
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No worries. In college classes, people don't see it either! Actually, most don't even get to your point in solving the equation haha.

  9. bettyboop8904
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that's how it is for me most of the time lol

  10. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.