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modphysnoob

  • 3 years ago

@JamesJ,@TuringTest can you explain me this

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  1. modphysnoob
    • 3 years ago
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  2. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    What part do you not understand?

  3. modphysnoob
    • 3 years ago
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    I meant ds

  4. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    \[x=r\cos\theta\]\[y=r\sin\theta\]\[z=z\]Then you need the Jacobian of the transformation... or you can just memorize that when switching to cylindrical or polar coordinates you pick up an extra r in the differential.

  5. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    check out example 2: http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/CalcIII/ChangeOfVariables.aspx try the same trick for cylindrical coordinates and you will find that you get the same thing i.e. the extra r

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