Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

mikaa_toxica13

fan and medal awarded Graph y = x^3 – 2x^2 + 6. Describe what you see.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. heathernelly
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    type online graphing calculator on google and chose the first one that says holt mcdougal

    • one year ago
  2. heathernelly
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then just type it in! :D

    • one year ago
  3. mikaa_toxica13
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my pc will lag. so i cant. can u jus help me ??

    • one year ago
  4. mikaa_toxica13
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @tcarroll010 can u help

    • one year ago
  5. tcarroll010
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ok, I got a hold of the older version. It looks like:

    • one year ago
    1 Attachment
  6. heathernelly
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah, that's what it looks like

    • one year ago
  7. mikaa_toxica13
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i need it described

    • one year ago
  8. tcarroll010
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You can see how it has a local maximum at x=0 and a local minimum at around x = 1.something and how it goes off to positive infinity as x gets larger and it goes to negative infinity as x gets smaller.

    • one year ago
  9. tcarroll010
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Are you in calculus?

    • one year ago
  10. mikaa_toxica13
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no thank god.

    • one year ago
  11. tcarroll010
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    If you are in calculus, if you take the first degree derivative, then you would see that the local minimum is at x= 4/3. It's good to know that that local minimum is at x= 4/3 even if you are not in calculus. Also, for further description, it has a y-intercept at (0, 6). We could try to see if the x-intercept is a rational zero.

    • one year ago
  12. tcarroll010
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ok, other things that might help you: we already covered that the local max is at (0, 6) and that is of course the y-intercept. The x-intercept is irrational (the x value for which the function equals "0") but it is approximately (-3/2, 0). We already described the end behaviors. The only last thing to say is squarely in the realm of calculus where the graph is "concave down" between x = negative infinity to 2/3 and it is "concave up" between x = 2/3 to positive infinity. "concave up" means that the graph looks like a "bowl" right-side up in that interval. "Concave down" is an inverted bowl. Hope this all helps. When I learned calculus a thousand years ago, this was the extent of everything we needed to know to graph, and we were able to graph these functions by hand with no computer, so since you are in algebra or algebra II, this really should be all you need I would think.

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.