anonymous
  • anonymous
what does maxwell-boltzmann distribution of velocities say?
MIT 8.01 Physics I Classical Mechanics, Fall 1999
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@UnkleRhaukus @sami-21
anonymous
  • anonymous
@AravindG
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
velocities of ?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
velocities of gases ?
AravindG
  • AravindG
In physics, particularly statistical mechanics, the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution describes particle speeds in gases, where the particles move freely without interacting with one another, except for very brief elastic collisions in which they may exchange momentum and kinetic energy, but do not change their respective states of intramolecular excitation, as a function of the temperature of the system, the mass of the particle, and speed of the particle. Particle in this context refers to the gaseous atoms or molecules – no difference is made between the two in its development and result.[1] It is a probability distribution (derived assuming isotropy) for the speed of a particle constituting the gas - the magnitude of its velocity vector, meaning that for a given temperature, the particle will have a speed selected randomly from the distribution, but is more likely to be within one range of some speeds than others.[2] source :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%E2%80%93Boltzmann_distribution
anonymous
  • anonymous
@sami-21 @UnkleRhaukus the velocity of free electrons..
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
i'm not sure

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