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Compassionate

Let's see how smart OpenStudy is. The light from the sun travels 187,000mps It hits earth in 8min. How far away is the earth form the sun given this information? How long would it take a Sakura Blossom falling at 5cm/sec to reach Earth from the Sun? Find the force being exerted by the light upon the Earth and how far the earth moves each year by the implications of light imposed upon Earth. Given the earth weighs: 5.972E24 kg How smart is OpenStudy? Lets see.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. AravindG
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    \[Speed=\dfrac{distance}{time}\]

    • one year ago
  2. AravindG
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    \[\LARGE \text{speed of light} =3 \times 10^8\] approx

    • one year ago
  3. AravindG
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    so I guess you can do part 1

    • one year ago
  4. Compassionate
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    >How long would it take a Sakura Blossom falling at 5cm/sec to reach Earth from the Sun?

    • one year ago
  5. AravindG
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    in part 2 you are given the speed and distance ,find time

    • one year ago
  6. AravindG
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    distance is got from part 1 :)

    • one year ago
  7. Compassionate
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    Correct. But you're not given the time at 5cm/s

    • one year ago
  8. AravindG
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    Part 2 asks for the time !!

    • one year ago
  9. Compassionate
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    There is no part 1 and 2. This is all one.

    • one year ago
  10. Compassionate
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    You want to find the distance given the speed and time.

    • one year ago
  11. ParthKohli
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    \[\rm force = mass \times acceleration\]

    • one year ago
  12. PeterPan
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    Let's see how smart OpenStudy is. --Part 1-- The light from the sun travels 187,000mps It hits earth in 8min. How far away is the earth form the sun given this information? --END Part 1-- --Part 2-- How long would it take a Sakura Blossom falling at 5cm/sec to reach Earth from the Sun? --End Part 2-- Find the force being exerted by the light upon the Earth and how far the earth moves each year by the implications of light imposed upon Earth. Given the earth weighs: 5.972E24 kg I'm sure this was what Aravind meant when he said part 1 and part 2

    • one year ago
  13. ParthKohli
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    Since the mass of light is \(0\), we can just say that light exerts a force of \(0N\)? I don't know, I am not so good at Physics. I think light does exert some force.

    • one year ago
  14. AravindG
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    @PeterPan thanks .Its always a good idea to break a question into parts :)

    • one year ago
  15. Compassionate
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    In fact, light does move the earth every year. I am asking you to find out given little information.

    • one year ago
  16. Compassionate
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    True, light has no stationary mass, but it has a force. Light can burn things, and that's a form of force.

    • one year ago
  17. AravindG
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    Light (as in photons) carries momentum. Any change in that momentum (such as absorption or reflection), will impart a force. So yes, it can exert a force. @ParthKohli

    • one year ago
  18. Compassionate
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    So, the question stands, how much force is exerted upon the earth each year and as a result moves it back.

    • one year ago
  19. AravindG
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    maybe @JamesJ can enlighten us on this

    • one year ago
  20. AravindG
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    what I can only predict is that the force may be around 1 newton or less,

    • one year ago
  21. AravindG
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    @Compassionate do you have the answer with you ?

    • one year ago
  22. Compassionate
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    I do.

    • one year ago
  23. JamesJ
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    Sure, the sun does exert a radiation pressure on the earth of around 4 microPascals, nearly all of it absorbed. So the force isn't quite as low as 1 Newton, but the acceleration due to it is tiny.

    • one year ago
  24. AravindG
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    I think he needs a numerical answer James

    • one year ago
  25. JamesJ
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    I'm not going to do the calculations here myself. I'll ask the questioner what they know about radiation pressure, and what relations they have that can help. I'm happy to be a thought partner. But not right now; I'm going to bed.

    • one year ago
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