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garner123

  • 3 years ago

Find the derivative of: y = cos^2(x) + cos(x^2)

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  1. tomo
    • 3 years ago
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    y = (cos(x))^2 + cos(x^2) //power rule for the cos(x). also you have to take the derivative of the inside of the cos(x) y' = 2*(cos(x))*(-sin(x)) + d/dx(cos(x^2)) // now take the derivative of the second part of the sum. no power rule. just take derivative of the cos() and then the derivative of the inside. y' = 2*(cos(x))*(-sin(x)) + (-sin(x^2))*(2x) // so you can factor a 2 if you want.

  2. garner123
    • 3 years ago
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    Why would you have the first -sin(x)?

  3. garner123
    • 3 years ago
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    Shouldn't it just be -1? I'm lost.

  4. tomo
    • 3 years ago
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    you have to take the derivative of the cos(x) which is -sin(x)

  5. garner123
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh right... duh. Thank you so much!

  6. tomo
    • 3 years ago
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    yw

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