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LucyLu15

  • one year ago

Can someone explain Strong Acid/Strong Base Titration? I do not understand.

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  1. cococupcoffee
    • one year ago
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    As far as I remember, when you have a strong base and strong acid (that you are mixing with each other), the components break apart 100%

  2. cococupcoffee
    • one year ago
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    Also, the pH of the mixture reaches 7 (neutral) when the equilibrium between the 2 is reached... and when you titrate, you use a known concentration of acid to find an (unknown) concentration of the base... thus, when both reach an equilibrium (where ratio of base: acid or vice versa is 1:1) you reach pH 7

  3. Preetha
    • one year ago
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    1. A strong Acid or base is 100% dissociated. Ionized. Weak acids andbases are not. 2. When an acid and a base react, the products are a salt and a water. 3. During titration, you take a known concentration of an acid, with a known volume, and add the unknown concentration of base drop by drop. You add an indicator (dye) which changes color when all the acid has reacted with the base. You stop adding the base. Now using the volume of base added, you can calculate the molarity of the base.

  4. cococupcoffee
    • one year ago
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    Wow, well explained Preetha. Also, you can apply this process to a known conc of base to find unknown conc of acid

  5. Preetha
    • one year ago
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    Yes. SA+SB--> Salt+water. You have 4 quantities, molarity of Acid, molarity of base, volume of acid and volume of base. You will be given 3 quantities and asked to calculate the fourth.

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