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Grazes

  • 3 years ago

In terms of intermolecular forces and heat, why does melting take less time than vaporization?

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  1. OkayOkay
    • 3 years ago
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    is it referring to water or any chemical?

  2. Grazes
    • 3 years ago
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    Any.

  3. OkayOkay
    • 3 years ago
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    hmm, well for vaporization the molecules need enough energy to overcome the intermolecular, attractive forces. Ice on the other hand does not need this energy to overcome attractive forces as they are still occur for liquids.

  4. OkayOkay
    • 3 years ago
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    What do you think?

  5. Grazes
    • 3 years ago
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    Well, how exactly do the molecules "overcome" the intermolecular forces? Do the bonds break?

  6. OkayOkay
    • 3 years ago
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    It depends on the compound for "bonds". Water has H-bonds but helium has weak intermolecular forces and no "bonds" to break. As heat is added, it increases the kinetic energy (vibrational and such). This kinetic energy overpowers the intermolecular forces when it becomes a gas.

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