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pottersheep

  • 3 years ago

Please help! "challenge" calc question. We just learned power, product, chain rules...(I have to draw it out)

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  1. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1360808280236:dw|

  2. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    I must evaluate that

  3. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't know how :(

  4. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    use the L'hopital hint : differentiate for the numerator and the denominator

  5. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    We haven't learned questient rule if that is what you are saying?

  6. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    quotient*

  7. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    it just the derivative of a function... u can use the basic formula : y = x^n ----> y ' = n*x^(n-1) y = a (a is constant) ---> y ' = 0

  8. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    I tried using product rule and I still got zeros in my denominator though

  9. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    we neednt use the product or quotien here, just deriv each terms

  10. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    derivative of x^1000 - 1 = ... ? derivative of x - 1 = .... ?

  11. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    ohhh because what I did was I wrote it as (X^1000-1)(x-1)^-1

  12. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    derivative of x^1000 - 1 = 1000x^999 derivative of x - 1 = 1?

  13. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    What do I do now?

  14. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    yes, that's right... now, just put x=1, u will get its answer

  15. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    no quotient rule? :o

  16. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1360809016288:dw| NO QUOTIENT RULE :)

  17. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    That's the right answer! Thank you, how come we dont have to use the quotient rule though if i have a fraction?

  18. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    and there is division

  19. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry, icant explaind more... my english so bad :)

  20. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    You're good at english I didnt even notice :) thank you for your time

  21. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
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    you're welcome :)

  22. SithsAndGiggles
    • 3 years ago
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    I'll try to explain why the quotient rule isn't used. What @RadEn described was L'Hopital's rule, which says that the limit of some rational function f(x)/g(x) (a ratio of f to g), where both f and g are differentiable and g(x) is non-zero, is equal to the limit of the ratio of the derivatives of f and g. \[\lim_{x\to c}\frac{f(x)}{g(x)}=\lim_{x\to c}\frac{f'(x)}{g'(x)}\] The quotient rule itself wasn't used because you do not find the derivative for f(x)/g(x), but rather f(x) and g(x) separately.

  23. pottersheep
    • 3 years ago
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    Ohhhhhhh thanks!!!

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