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gjhfdfg

  • 3 years ago

Find the domain,

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  1. gjhfdfg
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1361134701384:dw| Would it be - infinity 6?

  2. zenai
    • 3 years ago
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    okay for square roots you have a limiting situation. You cannot take a square root of a negative number. So when this equation equals a number below zero, it will not work. Therefore your domain would equal \[[6, \infty)\] because at x=6 it would be the square root of zero which is zero, however at anything lower it would be the square root of a negative number which cannot exist.

  3. gjhfdfg
    • 3 years ago
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    Wouldnt the infinity be negative though?

  4. zenai
    • 3 years ago
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    no, the infinity must be positive. Negative infinity means every number less than zero, your equation cannot have anything less than 6, and since negative infinity includes -7, -8, -9, etc it cannot be the answer.

  5. gjhfdfg
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't have a just 6 & positive infinity answer, thats why its throwing me off

  6. zenai
    • 3 years ago
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    hmmmmm, can you take a picture or type the rest of the answers?

  7. mathstudent55
    • 3 years ago
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    Solve the inequality that represents the problem. You want all values of x that make the radicand non-negative. 6 - x >= 0 -x >= -6 x <= 6

  8. zenai
    • 3 years ago
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    oh, I'm retarded, if its a NEGATIVE number the value is valid, if x = 7 for example, then the equation becomes wrong, you were right it is (negative inf, 6] sorry!

  9. mathstudent55
    • 3 years ago
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    (-infinity, 6]

  10. gjhfdfg
    • 3 years ago
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    Haha, no problem. It happens. :P But thanks anyways.!

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