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that1chick

  • 3 years ago

Hey, I had a question about an answer on a question... please look at http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/5054c511e4b0a91cdf44666c and answer my question

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  1. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    Why does it not times the 2 (the radicand) as well?

  2. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    Since it was in the parenthesis shouldn't it be multiplied too?

  3. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    or do you not times the radicand when finding the perimeter of a rectangle?

  4. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    Where do you have doubt in this? \[2(\sqrt{128}+\sqrt{200})= 2(8 \sqrt 2+ 10 \sqrt 2)= 2(18 \sqrt 2)=36 \sqrt 2\]

  5. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    @that1chick

  6. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    2(√128+√200)=2(8√2+10√2)=2(18√2)=36√2 or 36√4?

  7. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry my computer is being slow

  8. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    I just need to know if you times the radicand?

  9. EvonHowell
    • 3 years ago
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    Well, wouldn't you ask that in the other question ask the person who posted it?

  10. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    you have \[2\times18 \sqrt {2}\] you'll just multiply it by 18 \[36\sqrt 2\]

  11. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    It was posted a while ago... and I did

  12. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    @EvonHowell it's ok to ask as a new post. It's related to maths

  13. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    so in 2(18√2) you would only times the 18 by 2?

  14. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    @that1chick If you have \[2\sqrt 2\] then it's two times the radicand

  15. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    yes, if you have \[2\times (4\times 6)\] Would you multiply it to both 4 and 6?

  16. EvonHowell
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, I know it is I was just saying.. LOL but that question was asked 5 Months ago so I understand now :)

  17. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    Cool :)

  18. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    @that1chick do you get my point?

  19. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    Ok I get it... they shouldnt have put it in parenthesis. Thank you

  20. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    Nope, they can put in parenthesis. If you have \[a(b+c)=a\times b+a\times c\] \[a(b\times c)=(a\times b)c=a\times b\times c\]

  21. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    are you saying that it didnt change the radicand because it was applied to the value being times by the radical and therefor would be applied that way

  22. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    It's applied to the whole term if you have 2 *(4*6) you apply 2 to either 4 or 6 not both. In our case we have a radical so it's applied to 18, it can be applied to radical also \[2\times (18\sqrt {2})=18\times 2\sqrt 2\] Take the 2 inside \[18\times \sqrt{4\times 2}=18\sqrt 8\] radical is just a no.

  23. that1chick
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh okay... x the other value makes it towhere you dont have to simplify again... I get it now, thank you

  24. ash2326
    • 3 years ago
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    Good :) welcome

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