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mariomintchev Group Title

Need help with #4

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. e.cociuba Group Title
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    wats number 4??

    • one year ago
  2. mariomintchev Group Title
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    • one year ago
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  3. mariomintchev Group Title
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    ^^^

    • one year ago
  4. mariomintchev Group Title
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    @jim_thompson5910 @Jemurray3

    • one year ago
  5. mariomintchev Group Title
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    ok so, we have n=100 x bar=80,000 sigma=15,000 and we need mu with a 95% confidence interval

    • one year ago
  6. mariomintchev Group Title
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    |dw:1361314863406:dw|

    • one year ago
  7. Jemurray3 Group Title
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    Okay, so you seem to have it... two standard deviations above and below the mean.

    • one year ago
  8. mariomintchev Group Title
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    what would be my final answer exactly?

    • one year ago
  9. Jemurray3 Group Title
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    50k -110k.

    • one year ago
  10. phi Group Title
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    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confidence_interval#Practical_example They are *estimating* the mean salary of 80,000 and know (somehow) the population standard deviation. the sample mean (the 80,000) can be considered a random variable, with a normal distribution. It has the same mean (80,000) by a sigma_new= sigma/sqrt(samples)

    • one year ago
  11. phi Group Title
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    the sigma on your sample mean is 15,000/sqrt(100) = 1,500 now you can find the interval that contains 95% of the area: ±1.96 s. d.

    • one year ago
  12. mariomintchev Group Title
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    yeah, i did 80,000/ [15,000/ sqrt(100)] earlier and got 53.333....

    • one year ago
  13. mariomintchev Group Title
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    "now you can find the interval that contains 95% of the area: ±1.96 s. d." what do you mean?

    • one year ago
  14. phi Group Title
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    ? I would do 80,000 ± 1.96*1,500 as the interval

    • one year ago
  15. mariomintchev Group Title
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    yeah, 95 = 1.96 on the table

    • one year ago
  16. Jemurray3 Group Title
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    Oh, I misunderstood the question -- gotta read better. Phi's right about that.

    • one year ago
  17. mariomintchev Group Title
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    why 1,500? shouldn't it be 15,000?

    • one year ago
  18. phi Group Title
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    the idea is you sample 100 people and get a mean of 80,000 if you do that again and again (sampling a random subset of the population, with a sample size of 100) and compute the mean for each, you will get a normal distribution, with a mean of 80,000 and a s.d. of 1500

    • one year ago
  19. phi Group Title
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    the *true* (i.e. population mean as opposed to sample mean) will lie within the interval 80,000 ± 1.96*1500 with 95% confidence.

    • one year ago
  20. mariomintchev Group Title
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    but why 1500? why not 15,000???

    • one year ago
  21. phi Group Title
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    If you take a sample of 100 and find their mean, it will be close to the population (i.e. *true* mean). The sample mean will have a s.d. of population sigma/ sqrt(# of samples) I am sure there is a proof of this, but I don't remember it off-hand

    • one year ago
  22. mariomintchev Group Title
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    ok so the CI is (77,060, 82,940)

    • one year ago
  23. mariomintchev Group Title
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    i have a question for # 5 as well.... do we take all the numbers given and average them out and then place that mean on a normal distribution curve?

    • one year ago
  24. phi Group Title
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    for q4 (and I think question 5 also) you can think of each sample as a random variable with mean u and variance s^2 if you add n samples you get a new random variable with mean n*u and variance n*s^2 and standard deviation sqrt(n)* s now divide each statistic by n. you get n*u/n = u (the same mean as for the population) and a standard deviation of sqrt(n)*s/n = s/sqrt(n)

    • one year ago
  25. phi Group Title
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    Q5 is the same type as Q4, except you need to find the sample mean. Then you need to find the sample mean's std. = sigma/ sq rt(15)

    • one year ago
  26. mariomintchev Group Title
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    ok so i just need to find the mean of all the hours given

    • one year ago
  27. phi Group Title
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    yes, that will correspond to the 80,000 in Q4

    • one year ago
  28. mariomintchev Group Title
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    ok my final answer is (5.3, 10.7) when rounding off

    • one year ago
  29. mariomintchev Group Title
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    right?

    • one year ago
  30. phi Group Title
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    what did you get for the mean and std? what sigma gives 90% confidence?

    • one year ago
  31. mariomintchev Group Title
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    i did: n=15 sigma=6.3 x bar=8 6.3/sqrt(15) = 1.63 90% CI = 1.645 8 +- (1.645 * 1.63) (5.3, 10.7)

    • one year ago
  32. phi Group Title
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    OK, I got the same numbers

    • one year ago
  33. mariomintchev Group Title
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    shhweet

    • one year ago
  34. mariomintchev Group Title
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    can i bother you for one more question? its the only i have left. ...#11

    • one year ago
  35. mariomintchev Group Title
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    #11 part a, i got 81.6 and for part b, i got 159.6 but what about the error??

    • one year ago
  36. mariomintchev Group Title
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    Score = B0 + B1 (Hours) + Error

    • one year ago
  37. mariomintchev Group Title
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    All you have to do is plug in the numbers given for B0, B1, and the hours, but what about the + error ???

    • one year ago
  38. phi Group Title
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    I am wondering if the 159.6 is valid. I would think 100 is the best you can do.

    • one year ago
  39. mariomintchev Group Title
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    yeah that's what i was thinking, so the error has to be a negative number

    • one year ago
  40. mariomintchev Group Title
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    but where the heck would we get that number from the information provided?

    • one year ago
  41. phi Group Title
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    If you get an answer, let me know. I only know enough of this stuff to be dangerous.

    • one year ago
  42. mariomintchev Group Title
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    yeah, im trying to get some more help from someone cause i've obviously already tried on my own.

    • one year ago
  43. Jemurray3 Group Title
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    I see no reason that 159 is not a valid score, it doesn't say anything about it being a percentage. The regression neglecting the error is your estimate for an average student -- the error just quantifies how sure or unsure you are of your regression analysis.

    • one year ago
  44. mariomintchev Group Title
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    so 81.6 and 159.6 seem to be the correct answers?

    • one year ago
  45. mariomintchev Group Title
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    seems a little too simple... idk

    • one year ago
  46. mariomintchev Group Title
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    but i understand what you are saying

    • one year ago
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