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Envii

Will someone please explain what this is asking me? What conclusions can you make about the PV product with Ideal Gas 1, MW = 4 g/mol?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Envii
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    Based off of the portfolio I'm doing there is an inverse relationship between the pressure and volume.

    • one year ago
  2. Australopithecus
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    Not really sure I comprehend your question, particularly this part: What conclusions can you make about the PV product with Ideal Gas 1, MW = 4 g/mol? what do you mean by Ideal Gas 1 Anyways, I will try to help. PV = nRT Where, P = pressure (atm) V = volume (L) n = moles R = 0.082L*atm/(mol*K) T = Temperature (K) Lets see if there really is an inverse relationship between pressure and volume using simple algebra PV = nRT P = nRT/V Seems like there is, assuming moles, Temperature and R are constants. Pressure is proportional to the inverse of Volume

    • one year ago
  3. Australopithecus
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    This makes sense if you think about it higher pressure means that the gas is more condensed (bouncing off the sides of the container more) Thus as pressure increase volume Decrease Alternatively, As volume increases pressure decreases

    • one year ago
  4. Envii
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    7.336 1.000 7.336 2.445 3.000 7.335 1.223 6.000 7.338 815.1 9.000 7335.9

    • one year ago
  5. Envii
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    Well the first column going downward is Volume & then the second is pressure & the third is PV

    • one year ago
  6. Australopithecus
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    I'm not sure what you are asking? Can you please clarify your question. Know that PV is just Pressure*Volume

    • one year ago
  7. Envii
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    The numbers I just gave you are ideal gas 1 so how do I use that to answer the question being asked up above?

    • one year ago
  8. Australopithecus
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    It is asking you to look at the data and draw conclusions from it. What does this graph tell you about pressure in relation to volume and vice versa. I just went over it with you :)

    • one year ago
  9. Envii
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    That's what doesn't make sense to me I already answered a similar question I'lls how you. :P

    • one year ago
  10. Australopithecus
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    Well does the value of PV change much, when the ratio of Volume to Pressure is changed?

    • one year ago
  11. Envii
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    I'm so retarded, I was making things seem way harder than they actually were. u_u

    • one year ago
  12. Envii
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    I understand what the question is asking me. :P

    • one year ago
  13. Australopithecus
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    Don't be so hard on yourself, we are all guilty of over thinking things :) If you have any other questions feel free to ask me.

    • one year ago
  14. Envii
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    But what can I conclude when all of the PV products have no real relation? The first three PV products are 7. something but the last one is 7###. something.

    • one year ago
  15. Australopithecus
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    The units of PV are Pressure*Volume or atm*L Ignore the slight deviations, ultimately PV is a constant "PV = k1 which means that pressure multiplied by volume gives you a constant, k. This is not the same constant for every reaction; it differs from gas to gas." Source: http://www.wyzant.com/Help/Science/Chemistry/Gas_Laws/ Read the portion on Boyle's law

    • one year ago
  16. Envii
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    So would that be my answer? I did read a little I'm opening my book right now. xP Oh, and thank you for helping me!!!! :) <3

    • one year ago
  17. Australopithecus
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    You should also comment on the observed deviations in the PV constant, why do you think that there are deviations?

    • one year ago
  18. Envii
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    I'm reading about the constant etc. right now. I shoul dhave read my book maybe cakes. xP

    • one year ago
  19. Envii
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    What does that mean? :P

    • one year ago
  20. Australopithecus
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    What does what mean?

    • one year ago
  21. Envii
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    deviations in the PV constant, why do you think that there are deviations?

    • one year ago
  22. Australopithecus
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    Sorry tired I should rephrase that, You should also comment on the observed deviations in the PV constant, why do you think there are deviations in the results?

    • one year ago
  23. Envii
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    No need to apologize, what's deviations?

    • one year ago
  24. Australopithecus
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    notice how the values of PV are not the same for every result and that they differ, why do you think that they differ? Remember you are measuring these values in a lab.

    • one year ago
  25. Australopithecus
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    It might be good to include a reason for the deviations in PV, if it is a constant shouldn't every value observed be the same?

    • one year ago
  26. Envii
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    They differ because of the fact that there are different pressure and volume amounts?

    • one year ago
  27. Envii
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    I'm sorry for all of these questions you have been a big help!!! <3

    • one year ago
  28. Australopithecus
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    Ahhh nvm I'm tired and not making any sense sorry if I confused you. I just wanted to say that if these values were measured experimentally there could be error inherent in the results which could be a reason for seeing slight differences in PV value

    • one year ago
  29. Australopithecus
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    but I dont think that makes any sense so disregard it.

    • one year ago
  30. Envii
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    Alright, well thanks for all your help! :)

    • one year ago
  31. Australopithecus
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    Yeah No problem if you have any other questions feel free to message me

    • one year ago
  32. Envii
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    Thanks. ;)

    • one year ago
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