anonymous
  • anonymous
Will someone please explain what this is asking me? What conclusions can you make about the PV product with Ideal Gas 1, MW = 4 g/mol?
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Based off of the portfolio I'm doing there is an inverse relationship between the pressure and volume.
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Not really sure I comprehend your question, particularly this part: What conclusions can you make about the PV product with Ideal Gas 1, MW = 4 g/mol? what do you mean by Ideal Gas 1 Anyways, I will try to help. PV = nRT Where, P = pressure (atm) V = volume (L) n = moles R = 0.082L*atm/(mol*K) T = Temperature (K) Lets see if there really is an inverse relationship between pressure and volume using simple algebra PV = nRT P = nRT/V Seems like there is, assuming moles, Temperature and R are constants. Pressure is proportional to the inverse of Volume
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
This makes sense if you think about it higher pressure means that the gas is more condensed (bouncing off the sides of the container more) Thus as pressure increase volume Decrease Alternatively, As volume increases pressure decreases

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anonymous
  • anonymous
7.336 1.000 7.336 2.445 3.000 7.335 1.223 6.000 7.338 815.1 9.000 7335.9
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well the first column going downward is Volume & then the second is pressure & the third is PV
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
I'm not sure what you are asking? Can you please clarify your question. Know that PV is just Pressure*Volume
anonymous
  • anonymous
The numbers I just gave you are ideal gas 1 so how do I use that to answer the question being asked up above?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
It is asking you to look at the data and draw conclusions from it. What does this graph tell you about pressure in relation to volume and vice versa. I just went over it with you :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's what doesn't make sense to me I already answered a similar question I'lls how you. :P
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Well does the value of PV change much, when the ratio of Volume to Pressure is changed?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm so retarded, I was making things seem way harder than they actually were. u_u
anonymous
  • anonymous
I understand what the question is asking me. :P
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Don't be so hard on yourself, we are all guilty of over thinking things :) If you have any other questions feel free to ask me.
anonymous
  • anonymous
But what can I conclude when all of the PV products have no real relation? The first three PV products are 7. something but the last one is 7###. something.
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
The units of PV are Pressure*Volume or atm*L Ignore the slight deviations, ultimately PV is a constant "PV = k1 which means that pressure multiplied by volume gives you a constant, k. This is not the same constant for every reaction; it differs from gas to gas." Source: http://www.wyzant.com/Help/Science/Chemistry/Gas_Laws/ Read the portion on Boyle's law
anonymous
  • anonymous
So would that be my answer? I did read a little I'm opening my book right now. xP Oh, and thank you for helping me!!!! :) <3
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
You should also comment on the observed deviations in the PV constant, why do you think that there are deviations?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm reading about the constant etc. right now. I shoul dhave read my book maybe cakes. xP
anonymous
  • anonymous
What does that mean? :P
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
What does what mean?
anonymous
  • anonymous
deviations in the PV constant, why do you think that there are deviations?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Sorry tired I should rephrase that, You should also comment on the observed deviations in the PV constant, why do you think there are deviations in the results?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No need to apologize, what's deviations?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
notice how the values of PV are not the same for every result and that they differ, why do you think that they differ? Remember you are measuring these values in a lab.
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
It might be good to include a reason for the deviations in PV, if it is a constant shouldn't every value observed be the same?
anonymous
  • anonymous
They differ because of the fact that there are different pressure and volume amounts?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm sorry for all of these questions you have been a big help!!! <3
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Ahhh nvm I'm tired and not making any sense sorry if I confused you. I just wanted to say that if these values were measured experimentally there could be error inherent in the results which could be a reason for seeing slight differences in PV value
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
but I dont think that makes any sense so disregard it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright, well thanks for all your help! :)
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Yeah No problem if you have any other questions feel free to message me
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks. ;)

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