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ilene13

  • 3 years ago

The monster and the trickster figures are examples of which of the following? A. legends B. epics C. archetypes D. universal themes

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  1. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    i think it might be C but not sure anymore?

  2. tafkas77
    • 3 years ago
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    I can help! :) Let me read the question for a sec...

  3. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    okay thanks:)

  4. goformit100
    • 3 years ago
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    B. epics

  5. tafkas77
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay, so do you understand the answer choices?

  6. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    Not really because there like myth stuff

  7. tafkas77
    • 3 years ago
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    And goformit is wrong, by the way.

  8. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    i thought so because tricksters and monsters are bad so they cant be A or B

  9. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    right?

  10. tafkas77
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay, good, so let me give you an idea of what they're saying: a legend is mythical, something mysterious, like the tales of the Lost City of Atlantis. An Epic is similar, but heroic; like Odysseus. And you're right, A and B are wrong.

  11. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    so its D because i looked up what C means and its like nice

  12. tafkas77
    • 3 years ago
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    Well, actually, D is also incorrect. Universal themes tend to be ones that everyone usually relates to, like love, fear, perseverance, etc. The answer is "C" archetype, because an archetype is a common character or TYPE of thing.

  13. somebodys_heartbrake
    • 3 years ago
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    i think it would be C

  14. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    i had C the first time but i looked it up and it said it was something nice ? weird i probably took the definition incorrectly..... thank you :) makes sense now

  15. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    Which of the following correctly defines an epic? A. a lengthy narrative that alternates sections in prose with sections in verse B. a narrative whose central character experiences a conflict with nature C. a long narrative poem about important events in the history or folklore of a nation or culture D. a lengthy narrative whose plot features romantic love i think this is C can you tell me if im right?

  16. tafkas77
    • 3 years ago
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    You're welcome! :) For future reference in case you ever see archetype again: Archetype: "A very typical example of a certain person or thing." :)

  17. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks:)

  18. ilene13
    • 3 years ago
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    @tafkas77

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