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itsmylife Group Title

PI = 3.1415926 , i got a huge shock when i noticed this value , ever since ma 4th grade i knew pi=22/7 that gives pi= 3.142857 , but 22/7 is not actual pi, its an approximation , GROSS!!

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. pooja195 Group Title
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    ok?

    • one year ago
  2. itsmylife Group Title
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    you didnt get me or did you lol

    • one year ago
  3. pooja195 Group Title
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    something about pi

    • one year ago
  4. itsmylife Group Title
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    lol

    • one year ago
  5. NoelGreco Group Title
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    22/7 is rational, and therefore a repeating decimal. Pi is irrational. I wish you'd been my student.

    • one year ago
  6. dpaInc Group Title
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    Even what you have here, PI = 3.1415926, is still an approximation....

    • one year ago
  7. itsmylife Group Title
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    @NoelGreco pi can never be expressed as rational number and @dpaInc can you please tell me from where does the value originate

    • one year ago
  8. dpaInc Group Title
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    i don't understand ur question... but pi is basically the RATIO of a circle's circumference to its diameter: \(\large \pi = \frac{Circumference}{diameter} \) Wait.... ^^^ that's a RATIO of two numbers.... hmmm... maybe either circumference or diameter must be irrational also...

    • one year ago
  9. itsmylife Group Title
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    i knew pi=22/7 , recently i studied an article n gotta know that 22/7 is an approximation n like that ther r other numbers now ma question is from where does the value of pi originate, k lets say i have a circle of dia =2 now ratio of dia and circumference would be = pi, but what gives value of pi = 3.1415? where does this value originate from

    • one year ago
  10. dpaInc Group Title
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    sorry... i still don't understand ur question... that ratio just means if you take a piece of string the length of the diameter of ANY circle, that string will fit into the circumference slightly more than 3 times.... about 3.14 times.... and this is true for ANY circle.

    • one year ago
  11. itsmylife Group Title
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    k lets make it simple for one more time, concept of pi ??? and how pi equals to 3.1415.... ?

    • one year ago
  12. dpaInc Group Title
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    pi IS the constant RATIO of circumference to diameter... that ratio is the same no matter the circle u look at.

    • one year ago
  13. itsmylife Group Title
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    m sorry still i am just wondering fromwhere does pi = that constant number, what is the calculation of that constant

    • one year ago
  14. NoelGreco Group Title
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    ...and how accurately did you measure the circumference and diameter? Tell me your precision, and I can be more precise. There is a proof for the irrationality of pi here: http://www.coolissues.com/mathematics/Pi/pi.htm

    • one year ago
  15. itsmylife Group Title
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    fellas i understand all of you, i know you guys tryna say everything m just wondering from where does this constant originate , lets say planck's constant, it has been derived, lez say permittivity permeability every constant has been derived but where does pi come from

    • one year ago
  16. itsmylife Group Title
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    what gives value of pi = 3.1415.....? where does pi originate from? i know it could be a waste to talk about it but this constant has been ma favorite since 4th grade n now it has drawn a huge attention

    • one year ago
  17. dpaInc Group Title
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    where does c, speed of light, come from?

    • one year ago
  18. NoelGreco Group Title
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    \[\frac{ \pi }{ 4 }=1-\frac{ 1 }{ 3 }+\frac{ 1 }{ 5 }-\frac{ 1 }{ 7 }....\] Keep adding terms for additional accuracy

    • one year ago
  19. itsmylife Group Title
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    C has a very concrete solution in modern physics :) and @NoelGreco this is ma question where does this generate , idea of pi?

    • one year ago
  20. dpaInc Group Title
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    and what is it? c is the constant speed of light.... pi is the constant ratio of circ/diameter

    • one year ago
  21. itsmylife Group Title
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    k m tryna find where does pi come from but c has a whole derivation ;)

    • one year ago
  22. dpaInc Group Title
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    good luck guy... :)

    • one year ago
  23. itsmylife Group Title
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    :)

    • one year ago
  24. AccessDenied Group Title
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    I imagine that pi originiates, in a sense, from curiosity of some of the earliest mathematicians/geometers. They would see that all these circular things look similar, and so maybe there's a common theme. The easiest things to measure are circumference and diameter, so that'd be a natural step. What they could do, then, is look for patterns with their results. Does any ratio appear by messing with our numbers? Earlier math worked with fractions and no calculators, though, so they had to do it the long way. They would eventually get some approximations going, 22/7 could have been one. I can't say that's exactly what happened, its a little bit of speculation. Of course, as math evolves, different approaches would come up like using Calculus / series. (: --- An interesting video by numberphile (a nice video series on cool numbers): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpyrF_Ci2TQ Might be interesting for you as well.

    • one year ago
  25. itsmylife Group Title
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    @AccessDenied thank you very much :)

    • one year ago
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