Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Jonask

  • 3 years ago

Calculate the mass of iron metal (in grams) that can be prepared from 150 grams of aluminum and 250 grams of iron(III) oxide.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[ {F}e_2O_3+2Al\implies Al_2O_3+2Fe\]

  2. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2Al is the limiting reagent right

  3. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    did you check to see?

  4. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    novice in chem,well i just looked at the atom it has 2 moles and Fe2O3 has 1 so yeah

  5. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    to figure out which is limiting you want to to take Grams of reactant ->mols of reactant->moles of product with both... which ever can make the least amount of moles of product is your limiting reactant

  6. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    or limiting aent

  7. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Fe2O3 M=55 m=250 n=4.5 Al M=26 m=150 n=5.7

  8. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    alright and then there is 2 aluminum molecules per 2 iron

  9. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so you cna make 9.16 moles of iron with 9.16 moles of aluminum

  10. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wait 9.6 was error i took wrong mass Al n=5.7

  11. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    o wait nvm 5.7 molecules of aluminum can make 5.7 molecules for iron

  12. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Al:Fe 1:1

  13. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    however per each iron oxide molecule you can make 2 iron oxide molecules

  14. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  15. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so multiply 4.5*2 =9 moles of iron.... since you can only make 5.7 moles with the aluminum , Al is your limiting reagent

  16. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    now just change 5.7 moles of Fe to grams

  17. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    m=5.7*55=322g

  18. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so that would be your answer

  19. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so cant we say there 2Al n=5.7 but 2 moles n=2(5.7)

  20. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    answer not correct i think i made a mistake

  21. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the periodic table i am using says atomic weight =Al M=26g/mol is this the right thing to use as M

  22. Jonask
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    174.85 s the answer thanks

  23. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy