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JenniferSmart1

  • 2 years ago

@experimentX

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  1. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Let's start with Keplers laws

  2. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Let's see what I remember without looking at my cheat sheet

  3. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Something about \[T^2=R^3\]

  4. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    seems like I forgot Kepler laws ... let's see

  5. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    The period of an object orbital around the sun is proportional to the radius?

  6. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    whose radius? or perhaps some distance? The distance between that object and the sun?

  7. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kepler's_laws_of_planetary_motion ellipse ... semi major axis.

  8. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    no cheating haha

  9. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    :P

  10. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    draw it with me|dw:1361862577312:dw|

  11. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1361862616815:dw|

  12. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Let's see what I remember about the semi major axis.......

  13. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\LARGE (\frac{T_1}{T_2})^2=(\frac{R_1}{R_2})^3\]

  14. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\LARGE \frac{dA}{dT}=\frac{L}{2M}\]

  15. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    why do we have two semi major axis?

  16. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    what ratio is that?

  17. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    it doesn't matter which side you take ... lol

  18. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1361862832161:dw|

  19. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1361862878591:dw| Where is \(R_2\)

  20. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semi-major_axis

  21. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    >:O

  22. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    wiki didn't explain the ratio though

  23. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    LOL I'm tired. ok I get it

  24. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Let's talk about escape speed

  25. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\LARGE \sqrt{2gR}\]

  26. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1361863110279:dw| sweetheart, I have all the formulas staring at me from my notebook. I'm trying to have a discussion about those wonderful formulas

  27. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    something about when the kinetic energy reaches \(\frac{GMm}{r^2}\)?

  28. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1361863195805:dw|

  29. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    THanks! When do we know we have reached escape speed? \[U_f+K_f=U_i+K_i\] Let's derive escape speed. we don't have a final kinetic energy when we've reached escape speed correct?

  30. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\frac{-GMm}{R}+\frac{mv^2}{2}=0\]

  31. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    put the total energy=0 find V

  32. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Why what's the logic behind it? WHy is the total energy zero?

  33. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    If a body's total net mec. energy=0,it will escape from the earth's gravitational field

  34. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    find the total work done when bringing object from infinity to position 'r'

  35. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    oh ok, so when the kinetic energy equals the potential energy?

  36. DLS
    • 2 years ago
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    have u heard of binding energy

  37. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    Let's see if I remember. When E<0 or =0

  38. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    parabolic and hyperbolic orbits?

  39. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    that's when they're unbound correct?

  40. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    nope when E>0 is unbound

  41. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    when E is less than zero is the only time when it's bound

  42. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    So when the potential is greater than the kinetic energy the energy is bound?

  43. JenniferSmart1
    • 2 years ago
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    gotta sleep =) Thanks for the discussion everyone. I look forward to hear more about bounded and unbounded Energy when I wake up. See ya :)

  44. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    sorry ... was kinda busy not paying attention

  45. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    this way you can do it ... for escape velocity. |dw:1361863974972:dw|

  46. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    You can equate those two, and hence get the result ...

  47. experimentX
    • 2 years ago
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    I think ... if the velocity is less than esc velocity, the orbit will be elliptical or circular at escape velocity, the orbit is parabolic, and beyond that .... it's hyperbolic.

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