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hba

  • 3 years ago

Find the domain and range of the following functions: (a)y=secx

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  1. uri
    • 3 years ago
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    K.

  2. yaho021
    • 3 years ago
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    \[x \neq \frac{ \Pi }{ 2 }, \frac{ 3\Pi }{ 2 }, \frac{ 5\Pi }{ 2 }, . . . . . . .\] \[range : y \ge 1 and y \le -1\]

  3. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Ahm @yaho021 Domain=R-{x=n(pi/2)} Where pi=1,3,5........ Couldn't get the range thing :/

  4. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    How do we determine the range ?

  5. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\sec(x) = \dfrac{1}{\cos(x)}\]The range of values is \((\infty , -\infty)\).

  6. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    I may be wrong... let's see

  7. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Everyone is confusing me :/

  8. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    No, I meant when \(\cos(x)\) tends to \(0\) from the right side, then \(\sec(x) \) goes towards \(\infty\). And when it tends to \(0\) from the left, then \(\sec(x)\) goes towards \( -\infty\).

  9. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    So the range is all real numbers.

  10. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay someone said it would be All real numbers-(-1,1)

  11. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    That's the range of \(\cos(x)\), not \(\sec(x)\)

  12. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Think about the range of \(\dfrac{1}{x}\). Whenever \(x\) is near zero, \(\dfrac{1}{x}\) is near infinity.

  13. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\dfrac{1}{0.0000001} = 1000000\]

  14. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    @Mimi_x3 lol so true :p

  15. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    YAY! I was right! I thought I'd make a fool of myself

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