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lala2

  • one year ago

Help!

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  1. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Okay, first things first. Do you understand the concept of speciation?

  2. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Great. Do you understand the process of "isolation"?

  3. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Ha ha, yay! :) Isolation occurs in biological habitats, and it is defined as the inability for two species to mate and produce healthy offspring. The scientific term for it (and what you'll commonly hear) is reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolation comes in a few different forms: ☼ Allopatric speciation ☼ Sympatric speciation and ☼ Parapatric speciation (rare) Any of this sound familiar? :)

  4. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Great! That's perfectly fine. Because of the fanciness of those terms, it mind sound a little weird at first. I can define those for you to help you out. :)

  5. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @tafkas77 Hmm....Applaud u for ur Great Work...

  6. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Wow, thank you, @Koikkara and @lala2 That's really cool of you guys to say that. :) lala, I'm defying those words for you to help you understand it, okay?

  7. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @lala2 .....Hmm..u r appreciated too for sharing with him,,,,,

  8. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @ refer.....similar questions and knowlege guide.... http://www.krivda.net/books/postlethwait__hopson-modern_biology_-_vocabulary_17

  9. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    @Koikkara Aw, come on! "him"? I'm a girl! :D Hee hee. :) ☼Allopatric Speciation - when species are divided geographically. That means they get separated on different lands, like through import/export. Sometimes, this will happen to one species, and the organisms will have to adapt. Sometimes, they even form new species because of their adaptations! :) ☼Sympatric Speciation- when species can no longer mate because of differences in sexual cycles, or even mutations in genetics (polyploidy). ☼Parapatric Speciation - when species get divided on the SAME land. It's quite rare, which is probably why you haven't heard of it. Make sense?

  10. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @tafkas77 ...oh sorry little sis.....well i'm busy time to collg....

  11. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Right. I found a link that might be helpful to you, especially with sympatric speciation. You can read the text if you want, but honestly, looking at the bold print and the pictures will get the main idea across.

  12. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/evo_44

  13. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @tafkas77 ....well try out this picture (She is my cousin)..well, its time.....

  14. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Ha ha, thanks. I'm sure that would help, but would your cousin mind? Ha, well, goodbye, have a good one @Koikkara

  15. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    well, she just kid...lol

  16. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    @lala2 I am reviewing your question. :)

  17. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Hmmm... I have come up with an answer, I think. But I'm going to request one more minute to mull it over. I want to be sure that I'm not missing anything on this chart. :)

  18. lala2
    • one year ago
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    ok...

  19. lala2
    • one year ago
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    would you mind erasing some responses the I hate having to scroll all the way down and up... ( I have OCD)

  20. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    No. You could not use the chart to see which kingdom it belongs to without evidence not provided on this chart. Do you see what evidence I mean? *Hint* Look at Protista, Fungi and Animalia and see what's different between them. And sure thing! :)

  21. lala2
    • one year ago
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    ok... I dont see the evidence.. im not getting that part

  22. lala2
    • one year ago
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    animalia has no cell wall

  23. lala2
    • one year ago
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    fungi and animalia are he heterophe

  24. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Good. Try looking at Protista and Animalia's Cell Structure and Cell Number. Because there are differences AND similarities between them in those categories, we can't use this chart to say "This is a protist" or "this is an animal" because it could be either one. We'd need evidence not included on this chart (like characteristics - ex: does it have limbs?) to figure out what it is. We can use the chart to make a *guess* but if we need to be accurate, the chart alone just isn't going to cut it. Does this make sense now?

  25. lala2
    • one year ago
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    oh ok ! yeah i get it!

  26. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Awesome! :D Well, it's almost time for me to go. Do you need anymore help tonight?

  27. lala2
    • one year ago
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    I needed one more question... but if you are in a hurry its ok

  28. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    Hmmm... unfortunately, although I'd like to, I don't think I can give you my usual amount of help. What I can say before I must leave is that the whale shark and the humpback whale, while probably the closest in size and shape, aren't that closely related. This chart lists their information from kingdom all the way down to species. Even though they're both in kingdom animalia and phylum Chordata, they are not really related beyond those things at all. After phylum, it's way different.

  29. lala2
    • one year ago
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    oh ok thank you so much for your help :)

  30. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    you're welcome! Good luck in your studies. I suppose I may "see" you tomorrow. :)

  31. lala2
    • one year ago
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    yeah probably! thanks again!! :) :)

  32. tafkas77
    • one year ago
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    of course. :) tafkas (the GIRL) out! :D

  33. lala2
    • one year ago
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    haha!

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