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ParthKohli

  • one year ago

If my weight is \(50\) kilograms, does that mean that my mass is \(5\) kilograms?

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  1. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    \[\mathsf{W = mg}\]So, \(\mathsf{50 = 5 \times 10 }\)

  2. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    I have normally seen in questions that they assume a person's mass to be \(60\) kg. So would their weight be \(600\) kg? Impossibru!

  3. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    You should say weight is 50 newtons, and it also depends on the gravity, whether you're on earth or mars etc.

  4. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    I'm assuming it to be on Earth.

  5. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    weight is in newtons, they should've written it 600 N, not 600 kg, lol

  6. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    So my weight is \(50 ~ \rm kg ~ ms^{-2}\), correct?

  7. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    yeah if that's your weight..

  8. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Approximately, yeah.

  9. rutvi
    • one year ago
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    when u say ur weight is 50kgm/s u mean to say that ur mass is 5 kgs....nd i don think u mean u to say that when u stand on a weighing machine the scale show 5 kg!!

  10. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    @rutvi There's a misconception on the word "weight" used in our daily lives and "weight" in physics. In physics weight is in newtons and in normal situation we use weight as in kilograms, rather than saying mass.

  11. rutvi
    • one year ago
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    @sam i very well know the difference between weight nd mass in physics nd day to day life also...thats y i m telling that 50kgm/s is a very absurd weight of a grown person

  12. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    Yes and its kg m/s^2 :D

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