Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

mikaa_toxica13

  • one year ago

1995, the United States introduced the varicella, or chicken pox, vaccine to the general public. This immunization gives you a small dose of the chicken pox. isnt it supposed to shorten your chances of getting it ??

  • This Question is Closed
  1. dave0616
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes, how a vaccine works is that it inserts a small amount of the (usually dead) virus inside you, so that when the full blown attack of whatever virus it is, your body already knows how to fight it. While this does not work 100% of the time, it does greatly reduce the risk of catching the disease.

  2. mikaa_toxica13
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but u can only get chicken pox once. so what would the point of that be ?

  3. dave0616
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    What is the point of getting the vaccine? The point of the vaccine is to avoid getting it in the first place. Chicken pox is incredibly contagious, and as time goes on and more people get the vaccine, the disease will become something of the past, like polio, and it will be incredibly rare to get it.

  4. sseebeck
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    They are trying to eradicate chicken pox because they have found that children who have been exposed to a live chicken pox virus are likely to develop shingles later in life. When infected the varicella virus embeds itself in nerve cells and is kept dormant. As you age your ability to suppress the virus decreases which can result in painful shingles outbreaks. After being infected by a virus your body may take more than 7 days to identify and produce antibodies for the invading virus giving it plenty of time to embed itself in nerve cells. Vaccinations give your body a non threatening practice run. Once the body identifies a virus it saves that information and subsequent infections are recognized and attacked much faster.

  5. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    Search OpenStudy
    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.