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elexusvanderhorst

  • one year ago

please help attached below

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  1. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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  2. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Let the number of daisies = d Let the number of roses = r Since he buys 3 more daisies than roses, you get the equation d = r + 3 The cost of each rose is $3, so the cost of r roses is 3r The cost of each daisy is $1, so the cost of d daisies is 1d or just d The total cost is 3r + d = 15 Solve the two equations simultaneously: d = r + 3 3r + d = 15

  3. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    i dont get it

  4. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Are you learning about systems of equations?

  5. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    Using Linear Equations to Solve Problems

  6. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Ok, let's do it with one single equation.

  7. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    i dont know how to do that though

  8. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    so 1+3 prety much

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    No, not exactly. If the number of roses is 1, you have 1 + 3 daisies = 4 daisies. But you don't know how many roses you have, so you let the variable r stand for the number of roses. Then whatever r is, if you add 3 to it, you have the number of daisies.

  10. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    i stil dont get it im sorry

  11. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    How do you represent an unknown amount in algebra? You use a variable which is a letter to represent it.

  12. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    i know

  13. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    In this case, we have two things we don't know, and we are trying to find out. The two things are the number of roses and the number of daisies.

  14. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    yeah

  15. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    We are given some information that allows us to find the number of roses and the number od daisies.

  16. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    One piece of information we are given is that whatever number of roses and daisies we will have, there are 3 more daisies than roses.

  17. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    yes and this is so confusing

  18. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Follow along, I'm explaining it step by step. Since we are using algebra to answer this question, and not some type of guess, we need to turn the question into an algebra problem. Algebra problems are usually solved with equations.

  19. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    In order to wrtite an equation that will help us solve this problem, we need to call some unknown numbers by letters, which are called variables in algebra.

  20. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    What are the unknown numbers we want to find? 1. The number of roses 2. The number of daisies

  21. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    both

  22. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Right. Since the word rose starts with the letter r, to make it easy to remember, I will let the letter r mean the number of roses.

  23. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    As of now, we don't know how many roses we have, but the letter r means the number of roses. We write this as: Let r = the number of roses

  24. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    We assigned the variable r to the unknown number of roses.

  25. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    ok

  26. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now we work with thte information we are given. We are looking for two unknown numbers, the number of roses and the number of daisies. We don't know either one, but so far we have called the number of roses r. Now we need to deal with the number of daisies. We don't know that number either, but we do know something about it.

  27. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The question states: "He buys 3 more daisies than roses". Since we are callonmg the number of roses r, and there are 3 more daisies than roses, what can we call the number of daisies? The number of roses plus 3. That is r + 3

  28. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now we have variables assigned to both of our unknowns: r = number of roses r + 3 = number of daisies

  29. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    daisies=d

  30. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Yes, you can call daisies d, but it won't help as much as calling daisies r + 3, since you know whatever number of roses you have, if you add 3 to it, you'll get the number of daisies.

  31. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    ok sorry

  32. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Once again, r = number of roses r + 3 = number of daisies

  33. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now we move on to the given information about the prices of the flowers and the total amount spent.

  34. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    $15

  35. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The roses cost $3 each One rose costs 1 * $3 Two roses cost 2 * $3 Three roses cost 3 * $3 Four roses cost 4 * $3 r roses cost?

  36. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The cost of the roses is the number of roses times the cost of 1 rose. If one rose costs $3, r roses cost r * 3 = 3r

  37. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The same thing is true about the cost of the daisies. 1 daisy costs 1 * $1 2 daisies cost 2 * $1 3 daisies cost 3 * $1 r + 3 daisies cost (r + 3)1 = r + 3

  38. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    so the answer is 3 roses?

  39. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Not yet. Now what is the total cost. You already mentioned it's $15. The cost of the roses + the cost of the daisies = total cost The cost of the roses = 3r The cost of the daisies = r + 3 The total cost = 15 Now we can write an equation for the costs: 3r + r + 3 = 15

  40. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now we solve our equation: 3r + r + 3 = 15 Add the 3r and r together: 4r + 3 = 15 Subtract 3 from both sides: 4r = 12 Divide both sides by 4: r = 3 Now that we know r = 3, the number of roses is 3, since there are 3 more daisies than roses, so there are 6 daisies. The final answer is: 3 roses, 6 daisies.

  41. elexusvanderhorst
    • one year ago
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    ok great thank you so much

  42. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Check: Cost of 3 roses: 3 * $3 = $9 Cost of 6 daisies: 6 * $1 = $6 Total cost: $9 + $6 = $15 Total cost is correct. 6 daisies is 3 more daisies than 3 roses. Answer is correct.

  43. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You are welcome.

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