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ayeitsdrew Group Title

What was the significance of the Second Great Awakening for the social reform movements of the 19th century? The Second Great Awakenng was an inspiration and organizing force for subsequent social movements. Social reformers fought against the religious dogma of the Second Great Awakening. The Second Great Awakening provided a clear blueprint for reforms in workers' rights. The Second Great Awakening stifled efforts by social reformers in the nineteenth century.

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  1. ayeitsdrew Group Title
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    does anyone know?

    • one year ago
  2. AngelPSP Group Title
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    it might be B the second one but i could be wrong since the first one makes sense as well.

    • one year ago
  3. najma Group Title
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    An important aspect of the theology behind the Second Great Awakening was a growing conviction among Americans that predestination - the idea that one's ultimate fate was preordained by God and not dependent upon any actions of the individual - was an old, tired idea whose time had come and gone. People became enamored with the idea of free will - the notion that people can choose their own course in life, including the choice of whether or not to accept the salvation offered by God through Jesus Christ. That idea of choice - the idea that people can choose to be saved - is pivotal to understanding the reform movements of the early- and mid-nineteenth century. Men and women across the country came to believe that they could choose to save not just themselves, but their families and their communities and their nation, as well. This freedom led to overt political action. Antislavery sympathizers, prohibitionists, women's righters, and even prison reformers all sought to make their world a better place through their conscious, thoughtful actions inspired by the belief in free will that spread across the nation.

    • one year ago
  4. najma Group Title
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    this will help

    • one year ago
  5. ayeitsdrew Group Title
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    after reading that i kinda agree its b

    • one year ago
  6. AngelPSP Group Title
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    yup

    • one year ago
  7. najma Group Title
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    i agree too

    • one year ago
  8. AngelPSP Group Title
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    the fact that it pointed out the religious dogma makes it correct.

    • one year ago
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