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aaronq

  • one year ago

does anyone where i can find isolobal fragment substitution exercises?

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  1. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    What's isobal fragment substitution?

  2. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    isolobal analogies i can explain or i can show you a link since i can't really draw pictures well on this http://www.adichemistry.com/inorganic/cochem/isolobality/isolobal-analogy.html

  3. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Oh! I think i'm more familiar with the term "isoelectronic" idk if it's the same.

  4. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    isoelectronic is more about the number of electrons, this is more about the molecular orbitals

  5. aaronq
    • one year ago
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  6. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I don't know about isobal, but I do know that a d7 complex has one electron in it's eg set allowing for pi-backbonding

  7. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    would you deduce that from the location of the orbital given that it's octahedral?

  8. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Yes. Assuming octahedral geometry, you have 3 orbitals in the t2g set, dxy, dxz, and dyz. and x2-y2 and z2 in the eg set (antibonding) which are higher in energy.

  9. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    assuming d7, you would have the t2g set filled and one electron in the eg set allowing bonding.

  10. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    allowing to bond with a molecule that donates one electron? Such as methane.

  11. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I don't know abt isobal, but i'm just going by what I think might be relevant? So I am not sure if i am actually answering your question correctly. Lol sorry abt that.

  12. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    thanks man, any input is helpful for a well-rounded understanding of chem, specially inorganic chem, which you're one of the few people on this site that actually know about. lol btw, which textbook did you use?

  13. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Inorganic Chemistry by Meissler 3rd ed. But i hear 4th ed is by far best

  14. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    did you find it hard to read? I'm using Housecroft for my class but it honestly takes me forever to read a few pages, it's way too dense.

  15. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I have the PDF version, if u have dropbox, u can download it. it was pretty clear.

  16. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    hmm how large is the file?

  17. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    27.1 MB

  18. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    i don't have any file sharing accounts. could you email it to me in like 2 parts? lol

  19. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    hmm...well its useful. i just prefer my USB. lol. but i'll send u the link. give me 2 mins.

  20. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    haha yeah ubs' are way more useful. thanks

  21. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I'll msg u the log in info so u can log in and download it.

  22. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    aight, thanks, i appreciate it.

  23. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    should work. if not lemme know.

  24. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    dope, it worked. thanks alot

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