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Why do deep-water waves sometimes break instead of just getting bigger? The waves can’t grow any more in size because there is less energy in the open ocean wave than there is in a near shore wave. The waves can’t grow any more in size because the energy from the winds is equal to the energy lost by the waves breaking and then leaving the fetch zone. The waves can’t grow any more in size because they are losing energy as it is transferred from the water to the wind.

  • one year ago
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    @tafkas77 do u know this??

    • one year ago
  2. tafkas77 Group Title
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    Yes I do. :) Do you have any idea or are you like 0_o ?

    • one year ago
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    Um The lesson was more confusing than anything for me and I have 6 of these stupid questions

    • one year ago
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    Hey i have to go get my brother from school BRB in 15, also can u awnser this question please! i dont need an explanation though If you were standing at the end of a pier with a stopwatch in hand, how would you measure the average WAVE PERIOD of the waves that pass by? Determine a fixed point on the pier and note the time between a crest and trough that reach that point. Stand at the end of the pier and record the amount of time that it takes for a wave to break from the crest to its trough. Stand at the end of the pier and record the distance from a wave's crest to its trough. Determine a fixed point on the pier and note the time between a crest and the next crest that reaches that point.

    • one year ago
  5. tafkas77 Group Title
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    Okay, so 0_o then, lol. No worries. I can help; fortunately I remember enough of this to help you. :) If, after i have helped you, you still need more help, this website is very helpful when it comes to waves: http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/students/waves/waves4.htm But the answer to your question has to deal with energy. Shallow waves have more energy, and this is why they do not break as frequently as deep waves. The faster a wave moves (ahem, deep waves) the more fragile the wave will become. And if it becomes too big (ahem, deep waves) to be supported by wave energy, then the wave will break. There is a lot less wave energy out there in the deep ocean.

    • one year ago
  6. tafkas77 Group Title
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    Oh, Marine science, huh? Took that last year.

    • one year ago
  7. tafkas77 Group Title
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    Wave period is determined by calculating the time that passes between two wave crests. So out of your choices, which one makes the most sense?

    • one year ago
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