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godorovg

  • 3 years ago

Okay here is the deal, I am studying to test out of two math classes, I need someone to show step by step how to Sum of products in trig and Cos laws I have problems this not a the test. i am only studying. I will be attending IU east on-line this summer studying math. Please show me how to do it not give me answers only thanks.

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  1. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    here is the problem cos6x+cos2x=0

  2. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    sin2xcos2x-cos2x=0

  3. inkyvoyd
    • 3 years ago
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    two tips that are meant as general self study guidelines: sign up for a free account on wolfram alpha, and use step-by-step solution after entering equations. Use resources such as Khan Academy, Purple Math (I believe), Wikipedia, and SOS math (I believe). I think paul's online math notes has good info too. Note that I have given you 7ish names and no links - trust me, these worked for me, especially the first, if you do not have openstudy to help you. Good luck, and have fun!

  4. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    Youtube also has some good math videos. Just type in sum and difference trig identity and you should find what you are you looking for.

  5. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    I know you plug in for this I am just not how?

  6. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    so we use this form in cosucosv=1/2{cosu-v)+cos(u+v0} so now we plug in?

  7. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    Cos u+Cos v =2Cos((u+v)/2)Cos((u-v)/2)

  8. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    So now just make the appropriate substitutions for u and v.

  9. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    when plugging in for U and v does the 1/2 mean a power?

  10. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    No, it's multiplying the sum and difference of the two angles by 1/2.

  11. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    cosucosv=1/2 cos 6x+cos2x=0

  12. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    is this right so far?

  13. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    Actually, it should be 2cos4xcos2x=0

  14. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    okay that is what I need help with?

  15. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    1/2 of 6 is only 3??

  16. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    Sum of 6x and 2x is 8x divided by 2 is 4x. Difference of 6x and 2x is 4x divided by 2 is 2x.

  17. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    You do not take halfe of each angle you take half of their sum and then half of their difference.

  18. godorovg
    • 3 years ago
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    so you add 6+2= 8 and than divide the sums by 2?

  19. calmat01
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, and then you do it again only use their difference.

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