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yashar806

Probability

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. yashar806
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    The following five games are scheduled to be played at the World curling championship one morning. The values in parentheses are the probabilities of each team winning their respective game. Game 1: Finland vs Germany Game 2:USA vs Switzerland Game3:Japan vs Canada Game4:Denmark vs Sweden Game 5:France vs Scotland The outcome of interest is the winners of the five games.how many out comes are contained in the sample space?

    • one year ago
  2. 14whitea
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    the answer is 5.

    • one year ago
  3. yashar806
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    No answer is 32

    • one year ago
  4. yashar806
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    But I don't know how

    • one year ago
  5. amistre64
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    there are no paranthesised values

    • one year ago
  6. yashar806
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    0.43 vs 0.57 0.28vs 0.72 0.11vs 0.89 0.33vs o.67 0.18vs 0.82

    • one year ago
  7. amistre64
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    assuming each game can only have one winner ... and he outcome of interest is the winners of the five games. a.b -> a c.d -> c e.f -> e g.h -> g i .j -> i which leads one to believe that the set of outcomes has a cardinality of 5 is there something else to the setup that we might be overlooking?

    • one year ago
  8. yashar806
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    But the answer is 32

    • one year ago
  9. amistre64
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    it might be asking, of the 10 teams, how many ways are there to choose 5 winners? (10P5)/5! 10.9.8.7.6 ----------- 5.4.3.2 2.9.7.2 ; .... is greater than 32 so its not that

    • one year ago
  10. yashar806
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    What is the probability that at least one underdog wins?

    • one year ago
  11. yashar806
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    Underdog is the team who is less likely to win

    • one year ago
  12. amistre64
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    i dont know the rules of how winners are paired up with losers ... so i cant even begin to make an educated run at this

    • one year ago
  13. amistre64
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    you have 5 teams in the running, 4 teams get paired up with a 1 team in the wings .... to do what? there is either assumed knowledge that is not present, or missing information that i cant deduce.

    • one year ago
  14. yashar806
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    The favourite is the team with the higher probability of winning

    • one year ago
  15. yashar806
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    Underdog is the team who is less likely to win

    • one year ago
  16. yashar806
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    What is the probability that at least one underdog wins?

    • one year ago
  17. yashar806
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    That's what all the question asking about

    • one year ago
  18. amistre64
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    thats doesnt really help me out in determining anything past the first round of winners and losers

    • one year ago
  19. amistre64
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    in any case, this question makes no sense to me so im not going to be of any use in solving it .... good luck

    • one year ago
  20. yashar806
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    I have included the relevant numbers for each team

    • one year ago
  21. amistre64
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    yes you have, and they still dont help me sort anything out ....

    • one year ago
  22. yashar806
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    Tomo help me

    • one year ago
  23. tomo
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    C(2,1)*C(2,1)*C(2,1)*C(2,1)*C(2,1) = 2^5 = 32

    • one year ago
  24. yashar806
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    What is the probability that at least one underdog wins?

    • one year ago
  25. tomo
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    1-P(no underdog wins)

    • one year ago
  26. yashar806
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    What are the non underdog wins?

    • one year ago
  27. amistre64
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    it almost sounds like a decision tree model http://www.bus.utk.edu/stat/datamining/Decision%20Trees%20for%20Predictive%20Modeling%20(Neville).pdf

    • one year ago
  28. amistre64
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    i see the 32 from 5 cases in there

    • one year ago
  29. tomo
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    Game 1: Finland vs Germany Game 2:USA vs Switzerland Game3:Japan vs Canada Game4:Denmark vs Sweden Game 5:France vs Scotland 0.43 vs 0.57 0.28 vs 0.72 0.11 vs 0.89 0.33 vs 0.67 0.18 vs 0.82 since they are independent P(A AND B) = P(A)*P(B) you want 1-[P(germany wins AND switzerland wins AND canda wins AND sweden wins AND scotland wins)] = 1-P(germany wins)*P(switzerland wins) *P(canada wins) * P(sweden wins) * P(scotland wins) = 1-(.57*.72*.89*.67*.82) = 0.7993283536

    • one year ago
  30. kropot72
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    Each game has 2 possible outcomes. The sample space is 2^5 = 32

    • one year ago
  31. yashar806
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    I see thank you very much tomo

    • one year ago
  32. tomo
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    your welcome

    • one year ago
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