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What are the basic facts of prohibition? What is the historical context of prohibition? What were the causes of Prohibition? What were its effects? Why is prohibition important for new citizens to understand? What perspective do your primary sources bring to understanding prohibition? How do your primary sources help you make your argument?

History
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you can google all of this. there should be a lot of information about the prohibition days.
i have tried they jux dont tell me and i dont have time to read
wow what is this

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Other answers:

it is for my history report
woo google this shiz
i have been for idk how many days
So convinced were they that alcohol was the cause of virtually all crime that, on the eve of Prohibition (1920-1933), some towns actually sold their jails. i During Prohibition, temperance activists hired a scholar to rewrite the Bible by removing all references to alcohol beverage. ii The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) strongly supported Prohibition and its strict enforcement. iii Because the temperance movement taught that alcohol was a poison, supporters insisted that school books never mention the contradictory fact that alcohol was commonly prescribed by physicians for medicinal and health purposes. iv Prohibitionists often advocated strong measures against those who did not comply with Prohibition. One suggested that the government distribute poisoned alcohol beverages through bootleggers (sellers of illegal alcohol) and acknowledged that several hundred thousand Americans would die as a result, but thought the cost well worth the enforcement of Prohibition. Others suggested that those who drank should be: hung by the tongue beneath an airplane and flown over the country exiled to concentration camps in the Aleutian Islands excluded from any and all churches forbidden to marry tortured branded whipped sterilized tattooed placed in bottle-shaped cages in public squares forced to swallow two ounces of caster oil executed, as well as their progeny to the fourth generation. v A major prohibitionist group, the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) taught as "scientific fact" that the majority of beer drinkers die from dropsie (edema or swelling). vi Prohibition agents routinely broke the law themselves. They shot innocent people and regularly destroyed citizens' vehicles, homes, businesses, and other valuable property. They even illegally sank a large Canadian ship. vii "Bathtub gin" got its name from the fact that alcohol, glycerine and juniper juice was mixed in bottles or jugs too tall to be filled with water from a sink tap so they were commonly filled under a bathtub tap. viii The speakeasy got its name because one had to whisper a code word or name through a slot in a locked door to gain admittance. ix Prohibition led to widespread disrespect for law. New York City alone had about thirty thousand (yes, 30,000) speakeasies. And even public leaders flaunted their disregard for the law. They included the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, who owned and operated an illegal still. x Some desperate and unfortunate people during Prohibition falsely believed that the undrinkable alcohol in antifreeze could be made safe and drinkable by filtering it through a loaf of bread. It couldn't and many were seriously injured or killed as a result. xi In Los Angeles, a jury that had heard a bootlegging case was itself put on trial after it drank the evidence. The jurors argued in their defense that they had simply been sampling the evidence to determine whether or not it contained alcohol, which they determined it did. However, because they consumed the evidence, the defendant charged with bootlegging had to be acquitted. xii When the ship, Washington, was launched, a bottle of water rather than Champagne, was ceremoniously broken across its bow. xiii Prohibition led to a boom in the cruise industry. By taking what were advertised as "cruises to nowhere," people could legally consume alcohol as soon as the ship entered international waters where they would typically cruise in circles. xiv National Prohibition not only failed to prevent the consumption of alcohol, but led to the extensive production of dangerous unregulated and untaxed alcohol, the development of organized crime, increased violence, and massive political corruption. xv The human body produces its own supply of alcohol naturally on a continuous basis, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Therefore, we always have alcohol in our bodies. xvi Prohibition clearly benefited some people. Notorious bootlegger Al Capone made $60,000,000...that's sixty million dollars...per year (untaxed!) while the average industrial worker earned less than $1,000 per year. xvii But not everyone benefited. By the time Prohibition was repealed, nearly 800 gangsters in the City of Chicago alone had been killed in bootleg-related shootings. And, of course, thousands of citizens were killed, blinded, or paralyzed as a result of drinking contaminated bootleg alcohol. xviii The "Father of Prohibition," Congressman Andrew J. Volstead, was defeated shortly after Prohibition was imposed. xix Repeal occurred at 4:31 p.m. on December 5, 1933, ending 13 years, 10 months, 19 days, 17 hours and 32.5 minutes of Prohibition. "What America needs now is a drink" declared President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the end of Prohibition. xx Although Prohibition was repealed 75 years ago, there are still hundreds of dry counties across the United States today. xxi
were did u find this lol

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